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Integration and Ceremonies

c-team gender integration ordeal brotherhood

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#21 prof

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 08:43 AM


 I really don't know how many of "my" team would sadly walk away but the team dynamic would most certainly be profoundly altered.

The change in dynamic is what has me concerned. Not just for ceremonies, but for the group overall.

 

It has been many years since I was involved in OA, so things may have changed already without my knowing it.

 

But in my day, it was a boy run organization. We pretty much had the run of the camp. When I chaired the ceremonial team, we camped apart from the rest of the group (usually occupying an old cabin). At any time, a few of us might be working on the ceremonial grounds. Others might be at the cabin working on their lines. Still others might be working in the main building with logistics or ceremonial supplies. Often, our ceremonial advisor would stay in the main area or not show up until ceremony time. It didn't matter. We knew what we needed to do and were trusted to do it. Through this were learned to work as a team and to accept responsibility.

 

What would change if half the ceremonial team was female?

Well, not sharing the same cabin is obvious.

But what about everything else? Would we need a team of advisors to follow the smaller groups around as they completed various tasks? If so, how would that affect the boy's feeling of trust and responsibility? On the other hand, would it be responsible, as an organization, to have mixed groups in the woods without a chaperone?

 

My musings, for what they may be worth.


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#22 qwazse

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 09:02 AM

First of all, we're a long way from half the ceremony team being female. But ...

...

What would change if half the ceremonial team was female?

Well, not sharing the same cabin is obvious.

But what about everything else? Would we need a team of advisors to follow the smaller groups around as they completed various tasks? If so, how would that affect the boy's feeling of trust and responsibility? On the other hand, would it be responsible, as an organization, to have mixed groups in the woods without a chaperone?

 

My musings, for what they may be worth.

A cabin properly divided with a tarp would suffice.

Yes, it is responsible to have mixed groups during day activities without a chaperon.

BUT training on personal safety awareness would be imperative.

AND it's a big country, so I can see some places where this would go over better than others.

 

This is the crux of the problem with BSA4G as currently proposed. Arrowmen will be nominated from troops of boys and girls who may not have had dealings with the opposite sex. That will be perfectly natural and accepted in some lodges (maybe even separate lodges for boys and girls). But, other lodges might expect more mixed-sex operations.


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#23 walk in the woods

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 12:35 PM

My observation as well. There are different roles for men and women. This is why youth should be encouraged to study their local tribes. Sex roles should be honored, together.

Thanks.


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