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Penn State Pro Wellness at Bashore Scout Reservation (PA)


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#21 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 07:01 AM

Excess sugar


These things are not universal so applying them to everyone is incorrect. Leave it up to the individual. Let's not police people's freedom of choice.
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#22 RememberSchiff

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 09:34 AM

Thanks I didn't finish that fragment about carbs and heart disease.

Excess sugar, whatever the source, can lead to higher triglyceride levels and increased weight, both heart risks. 

 

As stated in the links, the slushes and candy are still there. You seem upset that healthier alternatives were made available  giving the consumer more freedom of choice. 


Edited by RememberSchiff, 11 September 2017 - 09:38 AM.

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#23 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:18 AM

Thanks I didn't finish that fragment about carbs and heart disease.
Excess sugar, whatever the source, can lead to higher triglyceride levels and increased weight, both heart risks. 
 
As stated in the links, the slushes and candy are still there. You seem upset that healthier alternatives were made available  giving the consumer more freedom of choice.


I'm ticked about people making choices for others. Offer healthy food, great. Don't over engineer the offers though. Too much low/no fat, gluten-free, no oils food is ALSO bad for you. Some folks process carbs, oils, sugars, etc differently. This just smacked of too much engineering an outcome by limiting choices. Perhaps it was the way it's written.
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#24 NJCubScouter

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 12:12 PM

These things are not universal so applying them to everyone is incorrect. Leave it up to the individual. Let's not police people's freedom of choice.

 

I don't want to get too personal here, but is this the attitude you take with your own children?  Let them eat whatever they want?  Let the individual decide?

 

And yes, I realize this is different, but it's not that much different.


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#25 ItsBrian

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 01:32 PM

Carbs don't put you at risk for heart disease.
The point is that the Sugar Nazis don't have to manage what kids eat. Offer up healthy choice in the mess hall? Fine. Manage kids with limited snacking options in the TP is too much. Let kids be kids. If they're Scouts they get the food choices beat in to them in MBs and rank Advancement. The last thing they need is someone pushing carrots on them instead of slushes in the TP.


Science says otherwise... see links below.

https://www.livescie...urated-fat.html

https://www.diabetes...dr-salim-yusuf/

http://www.dailymail...urated-fat.html

https://health.cleve...r-heart-health/

And that’s only a few articles.
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#26 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 01:34 PM

I don't want to get too personal here, but is this the attitude you take with your own children?  Let them eat whatever they want?  Let the individual decide?
 
And yes, I realize this is different, but it's not that much different.


I stock the house with good and bad. I ask them what they want. I cook healthy but don't monitor what they eat at school, for snacks or when alone. I've taught them well and they know good from bad. Have they had cake for breakfast when on their own? Probably. But they've also had salads and fruit and milk and veggies in abundance too...all on their own.

I've noticed my friends who've always made these choice for their kids have obese 18-20-somethings because they never had to make the choices on their own. We talk so much about boy-lead and "train 'em, trust 'em, let them lead" but when it comes to nutritional choices we don't trust them anymore? So much for traditional scouting values.
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#27 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 01:41 PM

Science says otherwise... see links below.https://www.livescie...urated-fat.htmlhttps://www.diabetes...dr-salim-yusuf/http://www.dailymail...urated-fat.htmlhttps://health.cleve...r-heart-health/
And that’s only a few articles.


We are talking carbs, not saturated fats.

Not al carbs are the same. Heart disease is genetic and life-style induced. Eliminating carbs is not the answer to curing heart disease. If it were we'd have eradicated it years ago. Don't throw up a straw man. It's a complex issue that dictating choices won't work. Educating folks on the balance while giving a full (not limited) range of choices is the key. The biggest issue is being able to read your body and how it reacts to various foods. The wholesale elimination of "bad carbs" is very 1990s. Science has moved on from this notion. Read the APOE genomic research.
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#28 ItsBrian

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 01:46 PM

We are talking carbs, not saturated fats.
Not al carbs are the same. Heart disease is genetic and life-style induced. Eliminating carbs is not the answer to curing heart disease. If it were we'd have eradicated it years ago. Don't throw up a straw man. It's a complex issue that dictating choices won't work. Educating folks on the balance while giving a full (not limited) range of choices is the key. The biggest issue is being able to read your body and how it reacts to various foods. The wholesale elimination of "bad carbs" is very 1990s. Science has moved on from this notion. Read the APOE genomic research.


Carbs, anything can put you at risk for diabetes, heart disease, etc. Diabetes and a heart disease are *not* always heredity. I have studied it as a nursing student and if a parent doesn’t help show how they should eat at home, and continue at camp, then they’ll be just as bad. BUT, if they are educated at home, then come to camp and eat whatever, they probably won’t eat as healthy anymore before camp.
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#29 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:05 PM

Carbs, anything can put you at risk for diabetes, heart disease, etc. Diabetes and a heart disease are *not* always heredity. I have studied it as a nursing student and if a parent doesn’t help show how they should eat at home, and continue at camp, then they’ll be just as bad. BUT, if they are educated at home, then come to camp and eat whatever, they probably won’t eat as healthy anymore before camp.


And the converse is also true: You can show them what you want at camp, but if it ain't continued at home your basically wasting your time. We agree it's about educating youth we disagree that forcing a kid to make these choice, as well as limiting his choices, is wrong.
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#30 ItsBrian

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:11 PM

And the converse is also true: You can show them what you want at camp, but if it ain't continued at home your basically wasting your time. We agree it's about educating youth we disagree that forcing a kid to make these choice, as well as limiting his choices, is wrong.


So places like Whole Foods are not allowed to sell healthy food then if that’s what you’re implying? What if that’s the closest store to me? They’re forcing me to buy stuff...

Just a thought
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#31 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:18 PM

So places like Whole Foods are not allowed to sell healthy food then if that’s what you’re implying? What if that’s the closest store to me? They’re forcing me to buy stuff...
Just a thought


Again, another straw man not germane to the topic of educating Scouts about nutrition versus limiting their choices and forcing compliance on a Scout setting.

When we do menu planning does your unit override the patrols' choices and force them to eat well? Or do you teach them the right things and then let them practice it themselves? If the latter, then why wouldn't you do that at summer camp?
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#32 RememberSchiff

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:32 PM

When we do menu planning does your unit override the patrols' choices and force them to eat well? Or do you teach them the right things and then let them practice it themselves? If the latter, then why wouldn't you do that at summer camp?

 

Absolutely, we check them and follow the nutritional guidelines stated in their handbooks.  Otherwise,  what is the point in teaching nutrition and cooking if they are not meeting  the expectations of the Scouting program .

 

We have an ASM who approves menus and another who is available to assist in shopping within the patrol budget, less some Scout thought buying food at Whole Paycheck was a good idea.

 

:)


Edited by RememberSchiff, 11 September 2017 - 03:00 PM.
clarity

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#33 ItsBrian

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:55 PM

Absolutely, we check them and follow the nutritional guidelines stated in their handbooks.  Otherwise,  what is the point in teaching nutrition and cooking if they are not meeting our expectations. We have an ASM who approves menus and another who is available to assist in shopping within the patrol budget, less some Scout thought buying food at Whole Paycheck was a good idea.
 
:)


Same for my troop, we always make sure to follow the nutrition guidelines. It still may not be the best food for you to eat, but it’s netter then having a pound of bacon. Example, we do scrambled eggs, toast, and a piece or two of porkroll (if not from NJ might not know what this is). And we never make too much like some troops do, which causes Scouts to get seconds 5 times.
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#34 RememberSchiff

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 03:12 PM

Porkroll you get a +1 for that alone. Now if you had said scrapple too you would be a JASM.  :)


Edited by RememberSchiff, 11 September 2017 - 03:13 PM.

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#35 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 05:34 PM

Absolutely, we check them and follow the nutritional guidelines stated in their handbooks.  Otherwise,  what is the point in teaching nutrition and cooking if they are not meeting  the expectations of the Scouting program .
 
We have an ASM who approves menus and another who is available to assist in shopping within the patrol budget, less some Scout thought buying food at Whole Paycheck was a good idea.
 
:)


So ASMs override what the boys want?
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#36 RememberSchiff

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 06:09 PM

So ASMs override what the boys want?

 

If scouts, PL, and SPL  fail to follow the nutrition guidelines (MyPlate) in their handbook OR they did not consider food allergies in their patrol,  then ASM will not approve the menu, reminders given, and back to the drawing board.  Ditto for shopping in checking ingredients, cost, food packaging and storage.

 

We don't want the wrong food spoiling an outing for anybody. :(


Edited by RememberSchiff, 11 September 2017 - 06:14 PM.

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#37 Col. Flagg

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 08:40 PM

If scouts, PL, and SPL  fail to follow the nutrition guidelines (MyPlate) in their handbook OR they did not consider food allergies in their patrol,  then ASM will not approve the menu, reminders given, and back to the drawing board.  Ditto for shopping in checking ingredients, cost, food packaging and storage.
 
We don't want the wrong food spoiling an outing for anybody. :(


Yeah...well different strokes.

We train them and trust them. If they mess up they will learn their lesson. Allergies are one thing. Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.
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#38 ItsBrian

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:29 AM

Yeah...well different strokes.
We train them and trust them. If they mess up they will learn their lesson. Allergies are one thing. Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.


Ok, we don’t go that extreme to where they need whole wheat. Just like instead of getting potato chips, get baked ones, but they taste just as good. We want the food to taste good.
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#39 ItsBrian

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:29 AM

Yeah...well different strokes.
We train them and trust them. If they mess up they will learn their lesson. Allergies are one thing. Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.


Ok, we don’t go that extreme to where they need whole wheat. Just like instead of getting potato chips, get baked ones, but they taste just as good. We want the food to taste good.
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#40 NJCubScouter

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 02:06 PM

Not approving because they have pop tarts instead of whole wheat toast robs them of the learning experience and youth leadership opportunity IMHO.

 

Funny you should mention Pop Tarts.  In my troop they have been banned as a camping trip menu item for many years - since before my time.


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