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It's really very simple


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#1 SSScout

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:06 AM

I know some of you have "done" Philmont, done Northern Tier,  done the AT for some distance.  I few years ago, I was invited to walk the Camino de Santiago with a friend. He had some large changes in his life and  wanted to get away, to have a different perspective for awhile.  He called me his "lifeguard". I took that as a very big compliment. And so we mostly walked, carrying most of our material needs on our backs for several weeks.

 

What is it that makes these events, call them "expeditions". so memorable , so important to a person's life?   Such treks are "lived simply", taking only what we can carry.  Yes, we often depend on a lot of modern technology (whatever that technology is at the time. Compass? topo map?  GPS?), but it is what we carry on our back.   That's all we really need, isn't it?  

 

On my Camino trek, I had my friend and many new friends met and walked with along the way.  People helped us and we helped many when we needed the help.   Clean Water and places to rest on our way.

 

How complicated do we really need to make our life?  We are constantly bombarded with messages about what other people think we "need".  Vitamins?  Shingles?  Types of tea or water purification systems?  Detergents? shampoo?  Potatoe chips?  

 

What do we really NEED in our backpacks?   


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#2 qwazse

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:14 AM

... What do we really NEED in our backpacks?   

The coffee pot.

My barista's miscela blend, ground for espresso.


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#3 Col. Flagg

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:52 AM

The coffee pot.

My barista's miscela blend, ground for espresso.

 

Milk steamer for frothing. Cinnamon sprinkles. Someone to carry my gear.

 

In all seriousness, I use the Philmont list and then go ultra light from there. Depends on distance really. The one thing I won't skimp on is clean socks.


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#4 KenD500

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 11:17 AM

The mental cleansing that occurs on trips like that is why I camp.  You really realize what you NEED when you have to carry it.


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#5 blw2

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 02:02 PM

Similar in a way, and in another way not so much

but I recently did a family RV trip.  Approx 5,200 miles in 19 days with my wife and three kids living in approx 200 square feet.  Even at the end, I wasn't home sick, didn't miss my house, my stuff, work, any of it. Not one bit.  

I had what I needed with me (and then some!)


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#6 CalicoPenn

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 03:56 PM

The only thing I truly need in my backpack (beyond the basics of clothing, food and some tools like a knife, matches, and a headlight with spare batteries)  is my journal and writing/drawing instruments, and my camera, with spare batteries and a solar power recharging set.   The food I bring is stuff I can eat raw - I don't cook on the trail anymore.


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#7 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 05:37 PM

10 essentials, and a survival kit in a 1.5 QT BSA canteen case with a Sterno can in it. :) 

 

Seriously though, I like carrying a survival kit with multiple fire starting sources. That Sterno can I mentioned helped me and my partner avoid hypothermia.

 

I also carry a weather radio. When oldest was a Tiger, we were at a camp where rumors started flying about bad weather headed our way. Scared him, and I am not going keep a Cub Scout camping when he's terrified. Gives a bad camping experience that may throw throw them off camping. All it was was a little rain. That radio was extremely useful when the family went camping on a bald in the Appalachians.  After hearing all good weather reports from hikers with smartphones, just before bed I decided to check the weather radio. Found out a severe lighting storm was headed out way. That radio gave us just enough time to strike camp and get to a lower elevation before the heavens opened.


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"Train 'em. Trust 'em. LET THEM LEAD!" William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt


#8 Stosh

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 09:09 PM

I bought a rural parcel to retire on.  It's 9 acres with 8 of them woods.  I call it my "man cave".  It's were I go to get away from everything.  No phones allowed above the treeline.  I have a place where I always sit for the deer hunt every year.  After the first deer, it's where I go to just sit and watch next year's herd. 

 

I built trails throughout the area so my wife could walk the dog.  Dog's gone, but I still maintain the trails for the Mrs. and I.  Every spring on through the fall Wednesday morning is a trek up into the woods to see what's new with flowers, 'shrums, and wildlife. 

 

There's nothing more therapeutic than woodlands with nothing to do but sit and enjoy the trees.  The Mrs. suggested that maybe next year I can clear out a campsite for us.  :)


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#9 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 11:54 AM

People have written whole books on the phenomena of the therapy of the journey especially the ones in woods and mountains. I think it is having time to think with less distractions, the reality of carrying your 'house' on your back and how literal 'all that baggage' can be in slowing you down. For me it is the physical challenge and the planning. Even a bad hike makes me appreciate modern amenities like beds, AC, and inside plumbing.


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#10 Stosh

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 09:00 PM

If our world went back to a 3rd world subsistence situation, the vast majority of people would die of ignorance.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#11 Back Pack

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 07:53 AM

If our world went back to a 3rd world subsistence situation, the vast majority of people would die of ignorance.


...or incompetence.
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#12 Stosh

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 01:45 PM

Kinda reminds me of the old adage: "Be Prepared" I heard somewhere along the line.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)





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