Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

BSA Endorsement?


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#21 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2887 posts

Posted 22 June 2017 - 09:35 PM

Current learning is:

 

1. Alcohol w/in 20-30 mins

2. Strong detergent w/in 30-45 mins

3. Wash contaminated clothing separately

4. Longer-term:

          Apply cool compresses to the skin. 

          Topical treatments to relieve itching, including calamine lotion, oatmeal baths, or aluminum acetate

 

Of course,this may change, as it has in the past several times.


  • 0

#22 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 25 June 2017 - 07:03 PM

Better yet, learn what poison ivy looks like, stay away from it and one doesn't need to treat anything. 

 

Just went through this with my boys this afternoon.  And while we were at it, I pointed out a plant for them to identify and one boy went up and touched it.  It was stinging nettle.  He learned a valuable lesson on being safe.  Second lesson was when I took and grabbed and handful of jewel weed growing next to the nettles and told him to rub the leaves between his hands until the sting was gone. 

 

I don't think the boys will forget poison ivy, stinging nettle and jewel weed anytime soon.


  • 1

#23 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2887 posts

Posted 25 June 2017 - 07:38 PM

Better yet, learn what Giant Hogweed looks like.

 

http://www.dec.ny.go...mals/39809.html

 

https://www.google.c...sFsK1-QHLhb3YDw

 

This map is wrong.  The monster is seventy miles into eastern Ohio.  https://www.eddmaps....te.cfm?sub=4536


  • 2

#24 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 25 June 2017 - 09:41 PM

Around these parts of Wisconsin, this plant is known as Wild Parsnip.  It goes by a number of different common names.  Heracleum mantegazzianum is it's true Latin/scientific name.


  • 0

#25 scoutldr

scoutldr

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 4462 posts

Posted 26 June 2017 - 05:00 AM

Forgive me if some thought I was making an unreasonable "knee-jerk" reaction to seeing a Professional Scouter surrounded by youth in uniform endorsing a commercial product on national TV.  Now it seems the product is of questionable effectiveness (Trustworthy) and exorbitantly priced (Thrifty).  After some 40 years of being told that in unit fundraising, we can't wear uniforms to sell any product, lest it be inferred by the public that the BSA is officially endorsing it, unless of course, the product is the officially endorsed popcorn of questionable quality (Trustworthy) and exorbitantly priced (Thrifty). No, wait...never mind.  I see the pattern here.  Never mind.


  • 1

#26 CalicoPenn

CalicoPenn

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 3151 posts

Posted 26 June 2017 - 02:34 PM

Around these parts of Wisconsin, this plant is known as Wild Parsnip.  It goes by a number of different common names.  Heracleum mantegazzianum is it's true Latin/scientific name.

 

In Illinois, we have always called this giant hogsweed.  There are two smaller plants (small being relative - they still can grow to at least half the height of an adult human) that have the same kind of photo-sensitive effect and are much more common.  Cow parsnip - Heracleum maximum has, like the giant hogsweed, white umbels.  The plant we call wild parsnip has yellow umbels and not only looks like the parsnip plant of garden and farm, it shares the same latin name: Pastinaca sativa - which suggests to me the wild parsnip is just parsnips that have "escaped" the farm and is now growing wild.  The domestic parsnip has the same photo-sensitive chemicals that lead to the rashes one can get after encountering giant hogsweed, cow parsnip and wild parsnip in the wilds so I wouldn't go bombing through a farmer's fields of parsnip either.


  • 0

#27 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 26 June 2017 - 02:44 PM

Like stinging nettles, they are edible, but one has to learn how to handle them.  After all habanero peppers are toxic to humans, too.


  • 0

#28 Col. Flagg

Col. Flagg

    Robert E. Lee - Patriot

  • Members
  • 1348 posts

Posted 26 June 2017 - 03:11 PM

Did BSA endorse the use of stinging nettles or hogweed? Or did I miss the exit? ;)


Edited by Col. Flagg, 26 June 2017 - 03:11 PM.

  • 0

#29 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 26 June 2017 - 06:52 PM

If you look closely under the leaves of the jewel weed plant you will see a little fleur-de-lis showing BSA endorsement for stinging nettle poultice products.


  • 1

#30 scoutldr

scoutldr

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 4462 posts

Posted 27 June 2017 - 06:13 AM

And a "Made in China" sticker.


  • 2

#31 Peregrinator

Peregrinator

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 700 posts

Posted 28 June 2017 - 11:39 AM

My old time family doctor always said that you could do two things to a Poison Ivy rash:   If you washed it well, as soon as possible with warm water and Octogon soap, the rash would heal in ten days to two weeks.  If you treated it with Calomine lotion, it would heal in a week and a half to 14 days. 

I realize that this is a joke, but cold water is better because warm water will open up your pores.


  • 0

#32 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2887 posts

Posted 29 June 2017 - 07:52 PM

In Illinois, we have always called this giant hogsweed.  There are two smaller plants (small being relative - they still can grow to at least half the height of an adult human) that have the same kind of photo-sensitive effect and are much more common.  Cow parsnip - Heracleum maximum has, like the giant hogsweed, white umbels.  The plant we call wild parsnip has yellow umbels and not only looks like the parsnip plant of garden and farm, it shares the same latin name: Pastinaca sativa - which suggests to me the wild parsnip is just parsnips that have "escaped" the farm and is now growing wild.  The domestic parsnip has the same photo-sensitive chemicals that lead to the rashes one can get after encountering giant hogsweed, cow parsnip and wild parsnip in the wilds so I wouldn't go bombing through a farmer's fields of parsnip either.

Can these plants cause permanent blindness or tissue death of all layers of skin - as in down to muscle tissue?


  • 0




2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users


IPB Skin By Virteq