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Share your favorite Scouting success stories or victories here


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#1 Sentinel947

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:49 PM

Based on @MattR s post I thought this would be a fun thread to read! I'll start.

In 2010 I was a Troop Guide. We had 20 crossovers. 7 years later I'm an ASM and 9 are currently with the Troop as Seniors. They each earned Eagle. The 9th finished two weeks ago. I've received many hugs from crying moms and strong handshakes from proud dads. Scouts have called me out as a role model and mentor in their lives in their speeches at Eagle Court of Honor. So far in my short life, its probably the proudest I have ever been. Its made all the trials and tribulations of the last 7 years totally worth it.
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#2 Col. Flagg

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 02:18 PM

Two autistic young men made Eagle Scout under my watch. Both grew as young men, one being more higher functioning than the other. Both had only Scouting in their lives as free-time options. One delivered one of the best speeches during his ECOH mentioning the people who, if not for their help, he would not have made Eagle. I was one of those mentioned. A true high point for me.


Edited by Col. Flagg, 17 April 2017 - 02:18 PM.

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#3 CalicoPenn

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 02:31 PM

I may have told this story before - it happened about 12 years ago now - I was camping alone at a state park across the road from a local Boy Scout Troop.  I was a little worried about getting some peace and quiet but they all settled down about 8:00 each night and were away most of the day on Saturday doing their thing.

 

Sunday morning, I was taking down camp as they were taking down their camp.  I always carry a litter pick-up stick with me and was picking up litter along the way to the dumpster after I had policed my own site, which a couple boys watched with interest (because it was obvious I wasn't just picking up my own trash).  One of them asked my why I was doing this and I told them it was because I was a Boy Scout growing up and that's what Boy Scouts do - they clean up their campsites before leaving.  The boys ran to their SPL to tell them what I had said and while the drivers were starting to get antsy about getting on the road, the SPL got the boys together and started them policing the area  - not only did they police their camp sites, but all of the vacant camp sites in the area and the roads and pathways to the shower/bath house. 

 

The Scoutmaster came over to me with a wide grin on his face and shook my hand while thanking me because he had never seen the boys be that enthusiastic about end of trip policing.


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#4 CalicoPenn

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 02:49 PM

Kind of sad that this has been up for over 24 hours now and only 3 stories have been shared.


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#5 The Latin Scot

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 04:05 PM

I feel like I would need to post something every week if I wanted to keep up with how many wonderful things go on in our den! But last week I did experience a truly wonderful display of Scout spirit and kindness.

 

I have a boy who recently moved up to my Webelos den from Bears, and in my den we are very pro-uniform - we have inspections every week, I teach them about the history and significance of the uniform, and the boys love showing me the effort they put into looking good. Well, this boy comes from particularly indigent circumstances, and so the committee had been arranging for some kind of fund-raiser to help him get all the uniform parts he needs (which is most of it). I figured It would take a few months to save up enough, but that it would be worth it for him once he could look as sharp as all the other boys. His family is very poor, so I wanted to take the burden off of them while still giving him an opportunity to meet our dens standards.

 

Well, I also have an assistant den leader who is consistent, involved, and great with the boys - but he does NOT go beyond that. He never wears a uniform, he doesn't attend any meetings besides the weekly den meetings (which he attends faithfully, bless his heart), and he doesn't go to the pack meetings either. When he was young, his father was a zealous Scouter, but so over-anxious for him to achieve and advance that he refused to get past Life Scout as a boy, and he has carried a touch of resentment towards the Boy Scout program ever since. He is a great assistant for the 90 minutes I have him each week, but it doesn't usually go much further that that.

 

Anyway, while I was about to hold uniform inspections last week, he pulled me aside and discreetly asked if it was a good idea to hold them since the boy mentioned did not have much of a uniform. The boy had been a little sad that his "uniform" consisted of an old hat and neckerchief, even though I stressed the fact that a Scout is judged from his heart, not his outfit. I told my assistant that my hope was to maybe instill in him the willingness to work his own uniform, since it would probably be the only way, and he would need to be motivated to keep at it for a while. I admitted it was neither a perfect nor a complete plan, but I had been so concerned about giving this boy every advantage and opportunity possible that I didn't know what else to do. Knowing how poor his family is, and how rough his circumstances are, I had been losing a lot of sleep over this boy, but I KNEW that getting him into a new uniform would mean the WORLD to him. The boy deserved to wear the uniform, but how, I still didn't quite know. Well, he asked me if he could pitch in a little something. Naturally I said yes, and after the meeting he ran out to his car.

 

He came back and handed me some cash, telling me this: "Get him whatever he needs, and give the rest to his family. I have been with you for more than a year, and I know how much you love these boys. You actually understand what Scouting is about, so I know this will be well-spent. And don't tell anybody who donated it."

 

 

 

When he left, I counted out far over $100 in cash.

 

 

It was enough to get the boy a completely new uniform big enough for him grow into after he becomes a Boy Scout, and there was enough left over to help out his family as well. But more than that, it bought me a new perspective on what it means to be a Scout. The excitement in the boy's face when he got his new uniform; the tears in his mother's eyes when we brought everything to their home; the empathy in my assistant's heart when he saw a need and lent a hand - if I may steal the phrase to use in more meaningful circumstances, "THIS is Scouting."


Edited by The Latin Scot, 18 April 2017 - 04:06 PM.

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There is no such word as "Webelo." 

The only proper singular of Webelos Scouts is ... WEBELOS SCOUT!  


#6 Sentinel947

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 05:29 PM

Kind of sad that this has been up for over 24 hours now and only 3 stories have been shared.


Its also posted in the most quiet underused corner of the site. Lol
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#7 ianwilkins

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 02:36 AM

I got copied into an email yesterday, last we had two teams of five Explorers and Network (they were aged 16-21) go on a 4 day 3 night self sufficient lightweight walking expedition in Wales. We'd paid an external company to provide some kit, ensure training was ok, transport and remote supervision, as we don't have the time or specific mountain walking training required. It was organised by one of the Network (with help from dad). Back to the email...

 

Hi *******

 

Hope you have recovered from last week’s expedition, very impressed with everybody and the progression made through the expedition.

I have seen the practice expedition feedback from ***** and ****** and it is all very positive. This reflects highly on you in terms of organising and your leaders in regards to the experience you have all gained with Scouting, all of which contributed to an excellent practice expedition.

 

I'll take that. :)

 

They also sent a photo the organisers had taken on the third morning of four of them sat round with broad grins on their faces. They wanted to capture the moment because by the third morning it's apparently unusual for teams to be in such high spirits by then. It said a lot about them and their character. They've got that undefinable "scout stuff" that you know when you see it.

 

Ian


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#8 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 02:23 PM

Two of my Eagles are my favorite success story. Dad  left when they were young. Mom serving time in jail. Grandmother was raising them by herself. Living in a rough neighborhood, going to a school that had lots of drugs, gangs, etc. Grandmother had enough and got them involved in Scouting to keep them out of trouble.

 

One took to Scouting like a duck to water. He worked camp, did OA, got Eagle, etc.  He was the driving force to get a Venturing for the older Scouts who were getting bored and antsy. Long story short, he stayed active until he enlisted, and several of his friends stayed as active as can be with school and/or naval service. Once out of the military, he eventually started his own business, which he at some point he sold. He married his HS sweetheart, has three kids and is involved with his son in Scouting.

 

Brother was a bit of a trouble maker. Always causing problems. Something happened one summer, and he did a complete 180 degree turnaround. Instead of being the trouble maker, he became a leader. he worked camp, did OA, and Eagled. he was active until he went to college, and did some things as he could. he also served, married his HS sweetheart, and is doing well.

 

They had rough times, they had challenges. But Scouting helped them overcome.


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"Train 'em. Trust 'em. LET THEM LEAD!" William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt





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