Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Eagle Project - Who must participate


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 Scouting4Ever

Scouting4Ever

    Member

  • Members
  • 71 posts

Posted 29 March 2017 - 08:55 PM

If a Life Scout completes his Eagle project, and the work is done with another club, does it still count even though he was the only Scout who took part?
  • 0

#2 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 29 March 2017 - 09:02 PM

If it was approved properly it should pass.  One doesn't need to lead scouts or scouters to do the project.


  • 1

#3 qwazse

qwazse

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 6707 posts

Posted 29 March 2017 - 09:41 PM

Yes. Although we try to encourage scouts to involve other scouts as well as classmates and members of the community in their projects, sometimes it just doesn't work out that way.

 

If the "club" included other students, make sure the scout sends thank-you notes recognizing the hours they served. That may be important for the student's nomination to honor-societies or for senior projects.


  • 0

#4 Eagle94-A1

Eagle94-A1

    Been there. Done that.

  • Members
  • 1935 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 06:50 AM

I am going to say it depends. It better be written into the plan and noted during the approval process.

 

I say that because I saw one Eagle Project approved and executed with only 2 Scout's involved, the Life Scout and his First Class brother. Everyone else was in their church's youth group. His thoughts were, They were benefiting, they need need to be involved.

 

In the same district, but with a different advancement chairman, another Eagle project using non-scout labor had some issues. the DAC didn't like the non-Scout invovlement. That and he viewed the project as benefiting dogs and not the community. But since it was written into the plan was approved by the previous DAC, he had no choice but to accept it, especially since the project came about flawlessly. The Eagle in question did a lot of prep work to the point of making cardboard models to see how the items being build would work.

 

Irony about "benefiting a bunch of dogs and not the community" is this. When my camp had a lost camp situation, the group that the Eagle project was for came in to do search and rescue with their dogs.

 

Anyway, advise the Life that he definately needs to discuss that with the district folks during the approval process so it doesn't cause problems later.


  • 0

"Train 'em. Trust 'em. LET THEM LEAD!" William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt


#5 Back Pack

Back Pack

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 595 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:04 AM

As many have said if it's not in the GTA then how can anyone complain? If BSA required scout involvement they would have made it clear in the GTA.
  • 1

#6 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:14 AM

One of my Eagles did a post-construction cleanup and landscaping around his church.  The church members helping out-numbered the scouts 5 to one.  Even the Grounds Committee members took their cue from the Scout.  Scout did all the planning and followed the landscaping plan provided by the local business that was providing the plants.  Worked out really nice. 


  • 0

#7 Tampa Turtle

Tampa Turtle

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2586 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:46 AM

My son had a mix of Scouts, jrROTC buddies, and a couple guys from church. It's all good.


  • 0

#8 NJCubScouter

NJCubScouter

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 6154 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 08:18 AM

In the same district, but with a different advancement chairman, another Eagle project using non-scout labor had some issues. the DAC didn't like the non-Scout invovlement. 

 

The DAC was adding to the requirement, which says the Eagle candidate must "give leadership to others."  It does not say who the "others" need to be.

 

So I guess the best answer to Scouting4Ever's question is, it depends on whether the district is applying the requirements the way they are written, or adding to them.


Edited by NJCubScouter, 30 March 2017 - 08:20 AM.

  • 1

#9 CalicoPenn

CalicoPenn

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 3150 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 09:30 AM

The best answer is "Yes - it counts".

 

The ONLY Scout that is required to participate is the Eagle Scout candidate himself.  It's his project, after all. 


  • 0

#10 fred johnson

fred johnson

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 1592 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 03:05 PM

Best answer - "Yes - it counts" 

 

... but I must confess I do STRONGLY encourage the scout to include others beyond his own genetic tree.  


Edited by fred johnson, 30 March 2017 - 03:06 PM.

  • 2

#11 SSScout

SSScout

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 4033 posts

Posted 05 April 2017 - 08:35 PM

"His own genetic tree"? 

 

Scoutson's project was rehabbing the Rabbit Barn at the County Fair.  He did have some Scout folks in helping, but in reality, the majority (in numbers, anyway) were Four H and Rabbit Breeders Club people.   

 

As has been said, the only Scout required to be there, is the Eagle Candidate.


  • 0

#12 fred johnson

fred johnson

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 1592 posts

Posted 07 April 2017 - 10:04 AM

"His own genetic tree"? 

 

Scoutson's project was rehabbing the Rabbit Barn at the County Fair.  He did have some Scout folks in helping, but in reality, the majority (in numbers, anyway) were Four H and Rabbit Breeders Club people.   

 

As has been said, the only Scout required to be there, is the Eagle Candidate.

 

Scout does not need to be present at his own Eagle project.  He just needs to proposal a project and then plan and develop the project.  There is no requirement for the scout to actually participate in doing the project. 


  • 0

#13 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 07 April 2017 - 11:46 AM

Scout does not need to be present at his own Eagle project.  He just needs to proposal a project and then plan and develop the project.  There is no requirement for the scout to actually participate in doing the project. 

 

Fred, here's where I have difficulty with definitions.  Proposing, and then plan and develop it are all words that describe the task of the project.  It encompasses no need to lead people.  I would find it kinda hard to lead people and yet not be present to do so at the project execution.  To me, things that deal with tasks is management of time, talent and resources.  Leadership involves people following


  • 0

#14 Col. Flagg

Col. Flagg

    Robert E. Lee - Patriot

  • Members
  • 1348 posts

Posted 07 April 2017 - 01:39 PM

Fred, here's where I have difficulty with definitions.  Proposing, and then plan and develop it are all words that describe the task of the project.  It encompasses no need to lead people.  I would find it kinda hard to lead people and yet not be present to do so at the project execution.  To me, things that deal with tasks is management of time, talent and resources.  Leadership involves people following

 

Leadership is many things. It is planning, development, training and demonstration. I not sure I agree that someone can fulfill leadership without being there. You have to execute and show, lead, explain, answer, etc., during the project to show and demonstrate leadership.


  • 0

#15 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 07 April 2017 - 04:00 PM

Leadership is many things. It is planning, development, training and demonstration. I not sure I agree that someone can fulfill leadership without being there. You have to execute and show, lead, explain, answer, etc., during the project to show and demonstrate leadership.

 

Planning can be done by oneself, difficult to "lead" because it's a management of a task process.

 

Training involves instruction of people, the task at hand is for them to learn, not for them to follow you, other than your directions, but not necessarily you per se.

 

Demonstration and other teaching techniques on accomplishing a task?  It would be easier if one could program a robot to do precisely what is necessary to accomplish a task, but until then  one needs to have people follow directions and focus on the task.  It's kinda like the new kiosk ordering system at the fast food restaurant.  Pretty hard to lead those kiosks anywhere.

 

I have tried, but often fail to help people understand this difference between leadership and management, but until they have an epiphany, there's not much I can do.  I had one fella call me up at 1:00 am to tell me he finally figured it out.  :)

 

Are people there because they want to help you succeed?  and you work to offer satisfaction in their work? or is the task (project) the main focus and all these people that show up are the cogs and tools to make it happen?


  • 0

#16 fred johnson

fred johnson

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 1592 posts

Posted 10 April 2017 - 12:59 PM

I would find it kinda hard to lead people and yet not be present to do so at the project execution.  

 

I tend to agree.  But at the same time, the scout could fully setup the project with people in different roles and the project could occur.  I'm just noting that there is no requirement that the scout be there on the day that most people work.  

 

I made the comment because there is no requirement in workbook or the Guide To Advancement that the scout must be present when the majority of the work occurs.  


Edited by fred johnson, 10 April 2017 - 01:01 PM.

  • 0

#17 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 10 April 2017 - 01:35 PM

If the boy is smart enough to break down his work crew into two and each one starts on opposite ends of the trail needing restoration, it is obvious that the leader can't be in two places at the same time, but the project gets done in half the time.  :)


  • 0

#18 qwazse

qwazse

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 6707 posts

Posted 11 April 2017 - 09:04 AM

If the boy is smart enough to break down his work crew into two and each one starts on opposite ends of the trail needing restoration, it is obvious that the leader can't be in two places at the same time, but the project gets done in half the time.  :)

If the boy is smart enough to provide dinner at the midpoint (assuming a reputation for cooking up some serious meals), I bet the project time gets cut by more than half :D .


  • 0

#19 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 11 April 2017 - 01:53 PM

Without a doubt.  That would truly fall into the realm of leadership of "taking care of his boys".  If he takes care of them, they will follow by taking care of him.  It's always surprising to everyone that leadership is more effect in getting results and even beyond than just plain management and project completion.


  • 0

#20 RememberSchiff

RememberSchiff

    Your Friendly Neighborhood ModeratorMan

  • Moderators
  • 2892 posts

Posted 15 April 2017 - 05:36 AM

I tend to agree.  But at the same time, the scout could fully setup the project with people in different roles and the project could occur.  I'm just noting that there is no requirement that the scout be there on the day that most people work.  

 

I made the comment because there is no requirement in workbook or the Guide To Advancement that the scout must be present when the majority of the work occurs.  

 

Too true. I know a scout who was away on a school trip during his planned Eagle project work week. In his absence, he "delegated" the on-site project leadership to his Dad. :blink:

 

IMO, that was another troop service project not an Eagle service project.


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


IPB Skin By Virteq