Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Give me your Cold & Wet camping tips


  • Please log in to reply
44 replies to this topic

#21 qwazse

qwazse

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 6502 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 05:47 AM

Really important:

Folks often bring ground tarps to set their tents on. Those tarps have to be completely folded under the footprint of the tent. One exposed corner will ship more water into the middle of the tent than if a rain fly door was left open.
  • 3

#22 Stosh

Stosh

    BSA Heretic

  • Members
  • 12165 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:24 AM

Really important:

Folks often bring ground tarps to set their tents on. Those tarps have to be completely folded under the footprint of the tent. One exposed corner will ship more water into the middle of the tent than if a rain fly door was left open.

 

I was at national Jamboree and saw a troop from Arizona put their tents on oversized ground cloths.  I politely suggested they tuck them under.  I was informed that this is the way they always did it and that I should maybe tend to my own boys.  Two days later we had a good storm and two of the AZ leaders came over and apologized.  Even adults can learn along the way.


  • 0

Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#23 eagle90

eagle90

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 1233 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 08:58 AM

For those of us in the upper Midwest, 40's at night on a campout would, in some cases, be a godsend!  We have spent many a night in 20's and 30's.  There are a lots of good suggestions here though.


  • 0

#24 beaglelover

beaglelover

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 22 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 10:31 AM

I was at national Jamboree and saw a troop from Arizona put their tents on oversized ground cloths.  I politely suggested they tuck them under.  I was informed that this is the way they always did it and that I should maybe tend to my own boys.  Two days later we had a good storm and two of the AZ leaders came over and apologized.  Even adults can learn along the way.

 

I never understood that reaction.  Unless the suggestion is just truly dumb (hey, mix bleach & ammonia to get a great cleaning agent!) why not at least find out why a person suggested it.  I am not saying I would always take it, but why not at least find out the reasoning.  Respect for those leaders apologizing though, I have unfortunately met some who would not, no matter how wrong they were proven.

 

 

We bought 3 new tents so that all our boys could go on this camp.  Ended up getting tarps to go under them that are exactly 1 foot shorter in each direction to avoid said problem.  I know a lot of good tents can get by without, but these are cheap.  I hope they hold up if it gets bad, but cheap was all we could swing after already having to fund a camp kitchen.

 

 

And just to be clear--do NOT mix bleach & ammonia :)


  • 2

#25 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2840 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 11:15 AM

That overextended ground sheet really tests the waterproofing of the tent floor.  Since floors of many tents start out barely waterproof (1000 mm minimum standard) and inevitably go down from there,  trapping water between the ground sheet and the floor and applying the weight of a Scout typically pumps the water through the floor.  Buit as noted, even the most diplomatic suggestion can be suggested, as it was at our last IOLS course.  But we brought several LARGE sponges to bail out the resulting ponds.


  • 0

#26 blw2

blw2

    Troop Treasurer

  • Members
  • 1961 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 11:45 AM

Here's what looks like a good tip to me....

http://scoutmastercg...mping-gear-dry/

 

Yes, some of the best and most memorable trips are the ones with weather.... It seems more miserable when planning for it, than it actually is often times.

 

My experience is very low turn out with the cubs, when weather is foretasted.... as in so low it was only me and son in one case, and in another only me a den leader and our sons..... these were council camps so it was ok and we didn't have to cancel out of lack of interest.  Pack only trips a different story.....


  • 0

#27 DadScouts

DadScouts

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 72 posts

Posted 31 March 2017 - 07:57 AM

Plenty of warm and dry suggestions.  Best words I saw were good fire = good morale.  I would suggest once camp set up find a parent to walk around wearing nothing but a swim suit, shoes, and sunglasses (zinc oxide on the nose is a bonus) and check in on every scout.  Being wet is nothing - ask people in Hawaii on vacation.  Being warm is a state of mind.  Having FUN is important.  


  • 0

#28 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2840 posts

Posted 31 March 2017 - 08:24 AM

 A Mylar reflective blanket greatly increases the warming effect of a fire. which otherwise warms (by radiation) only the side facing the fire.

 

If cold is a state of mind, please attend our next Klondike here in NE Ohio in your swim suit.   :D  


  • 1

#29 Stosh

Stosh

    BSA Heretic

  • Members
  • 12165 posts

Posted 31 March 2017 - 10:39 AM

If cold is a state of mind, in the state of Wisconsin we don't mind.  :rolleyes:


  • 1

Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#30 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2840 posts

Posted 31 March 2017 - 11:13 AM

No one relied on state of mind in dressing us to walk to school in Stony Plain, Alberta in the Winter (-40 f several times).  Watching balls of spit bounce off the ground was great fun and the "coat room" was almost as large as the classroom.


  • 0

#31 Scouts2Mom

Scouts2Mom

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 22 April 2017 - 12:17 AM

I know this is late,  but i have my Cubs, and new to camping parents, use this product found at home depot / lowes.  It is basically bubble wrap with the thin silver space blanket material on both sides.And it reflects like 90% of your heat back at you,  and 90% of the cold ground back at the ground.

 

Reflectix 50-sq ft Reflective Roll Insulation (24-in W x 25-ft L)  About $25

 

 Cut a length and slip it into their sleeping bag.  Or sleep on top of it.  Put some on your camp chair and make a "hot seat". Even make a pancho out of it and duct tape.  The only down side, is it is slightly loud in the middle of the night as you roll over.  But we have used this in our beds in the north east when snow storms have cut power for days.  It is like sleeping on a full length heating pad.  

 

 


  • 0

#32 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2840 posts

Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:22 AM

We lose body heat by several mechanisms: radiation; conduction; convection; evaporation; and respiration.  The reflective coating helps reduce only radiant heat loss.  

 

The Mylar coating you seem to be describing, as on "Space Blankets," adds slightly to the reduction of heat loss achieved by by plain plastic by reducing loss of heat by radiation.   The plain plastic would be as effective against evaporative and convective heat loss.

 

The "bubbles" increase insulation value by creating "still" or "dead" air.  Plus.

 

Experiment with plastic sheeting and plain bubble pack.

 

http://undergroundme...-uses-for-them/


  • 0

#33 EagleonFire

EagleonFire

    Member

  • Members
  • 41 posts

Posted 22 April 2017 - 01:07 PM

I was at national Jamboree and saw a troop from Arizona put their tents on oversized ground cloths.  I politely suggested they tuck them under.  I was informed that this is the way they always did it and that I should maybe tend to my own boys.  Two days later we had a good storm and two of the AZ leaders came over and apologized.  Even adults can learn along the way.


I fight this with my co Leaders every time we go to a council camp. I leave to check everyone in and they take our group cloths and not only don't tuck them under but they shove a stake through them wher they hang over. It pisses me off since they have been told that that is basically defeating the purpose of the ground cloth. And ruining them in the process. The kids have been trained to do it right if the adults would just listen
  • 0

#34 MrBob

MrBob

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 197 posts

Posted 22 April 2017 - 03:12 PM

I know this is late,  but i have my Cubs, and new to camping parents, use this product found at home depot / lowes.  It is basically bubble wrap with the thin silver space blanket material on both sides.And it reflects like 90% of your heat back at you,  and 90% of the cold ground back at the ground.

 

Reflectix 50-sq ft Reflective Roll Insulation (24-in W x 25-ft L)  About $25

 

 Cut a length and slip it into their sleeping bag.  Or sleep on top of it.  Put some on your camp chair and make a "hot seat". Even make a pancho out of it and duct tape.  The only down side, is it is slightly loud in the middle of the night as you roll over.  But we have used this in our beds in the north east when snow storms have cut power for days.  It is like sleeping on a full length heating pad.  

 

Genius!


  • 0

#35 Stosh

Stosh

    BSA Heretic

  • Members
  • 12165 posts

Posted 22 April 2017 - 06:01 PM

I fight this with my co Leaders every time we go to a council camp. I leave to check everyone in and they take our group cloths and not only don't tuck them under but they shove a stake through them wher they hang over. It pisses me off since they have been told that that is basically defeating the purpose of the ground cloth. And ruining them in the process. The kids have been trained to do it right if the adults would just listen

 

I train my boys to tuck it under.  If they don't, as long as it doesn't rain, no big deal.  The floor of the tent is protected from rocks.sticks, etc. 

 

However, the first time it rains, all the rain runs off the rain fly and gets caught by the ground cloth which channels it under the tent like a rain gutter.  If my boys don't listen, eventually they will figure it out,...after that first rain. 

 

I try and not use the phrase, "I told you so..." which is so cliche.  Instead, I look in the tent, see the sopping mess and say, "I bet you don't do that again anytime soon..."  That officially ends the lesson.  


  • 2

Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#36 ianwilkins

ianwilkins

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 204 posts

Posted 27 April 2017 - 02:43 AM

If my boys don't listen, eventually they will figure it out,...after that first rain. 

 

 

Setting up hammocks...

 

Me: I think you really ought to have the tarp a bit more over the end of the hammock

Explorer Scout: Naaa Ian, it'll be fine

M: Okay, if you say so.

[after a rainy night]

ES: Ian, my sleeping bag is wet

M: why's that then?

ES: because it rained

M: nothing to do with the position of your tarp then?

ES: erm, well, errr....

 

My lot love to hammock, and they quite often pack the hammocks as close to each other as possible, and double deck them, so there will be three or four hammocks coming off a tree in different directions, making tarping them a little more tricky, non standard. They love it generally, as it means they're close to each other and can chat and so on, but it does mean sometimes that water feeds off a couple of tarps and merges together and all runs off in one corner, and I get a "had a really bad night's sleep, I could just hear water running off the tarp inches away from my head". I try to look vaguely sympathetic, but they don't usually buy it.


  • 0

#37 Stosh

Stosh

    BSA Heretic

  • Members
  • 12165 posts

Posted 27 April 2017 - 06:16 AM

We had a gully washer of a rain once and I was sleeping in an old military dog tent.  Had a ton of water run through the tent.  I was on a cot with 4" legs and my pack sitting on 3 rocks on the other side.  Boys couldn't figure out why I was the only one that was dry the next morning.  It took a little cramped aerobatics, but it can be done.

 

I have an A-Frame Civil War tent as well that allows me to stand up, have a full military sized cot, lawn chair and plastic tub as a nightstand.  Hooks on the ridgepole hold the pack off the ground as well   As long as everything is picked up and off the ground, they work great.  I find that often times the floored tents retain water better than just letting it run through.  With a heavy rain, just pull the cot to the middle so one doesn't touch the canvas and go to sleep.


  • 0

Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#38 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2840 posts

Posted 27 April 2017 - 08:28 AM

ian,

 

Your story reminds me of a conversation that began: "But if you pitch your tarp totally horizontal like that (so three of them could "fit"), what will happen if it rains hard?"

 

And it did.  Interesting noises when the hundreds of gallons of collected rainwater provided enough leverage to pull out the pegs about 3 AM.   :eek:


  • 1

#39 ianwilkins

ianwilkins

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 204 posts

Posted 27 April 2017 - 09:09 AM

ian,

 

Your story reminds me of a conversation that began: "But if you pitch your tarp totally horizontal like that (so three of them could "fit"), what will happen if it rains hard?"

 

And it did.  Interesting noises when the hundreds of gallons of collected rainwater provided enough leverage to pull out the pegs about 3 AM.   :eek:

 

And then one time they took ponchos that doubled up as tarps, and they managed to pitch it so the head hole wasn't at a low point, to start with, but the rain ran into the hood and weighted it down as it filled up, right over the hammock, then overflowed. I tried to be sympathetic, honest I did.


  • 1

#40 Stosh

Stosh

    BSA Heretic

  • Members
  • 12165 posts

Posted 27 April 2017 - 10:16 AM

And then one time they took ponchos that doubled up as tarps, and they managed to pitch it so the head hole wasn't at a low point, to start with, but the rain ran into the hood and weighted it down as it filled up, right over the hammock, then overflowed. I tried to be sympathetic, honest I did.

 

I like your style.  Best lessons are those taught at a practical level.  "Bummer, I bet you never do that again!"


  • 0

Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


IPB Skin By Virteq