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Ditch the Neckerchief


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#201 TAHAWK

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 10:49 AM

Inconsistency is not necessarily hypocrisy.  

 

The differences in Cub neckerchiefs are by program, not by den as such.

 

The BSA rule on neckerchiefs is largely ignored, like wearing denims with the blue Cub shirt.  Because most troops are not Patrol Method troops, there is little pressure for formally allowing patrol neckerchiefs.  Troop.  Troop.  Troop.

 

I think patrol neckerchiefs are a great idea, like large, square neckerchiefs and going back to registering patrols as "units."   So long as it has no financial impact, BSA would like those ideas too.


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#202 The Latin Scot

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 11:00 AM

Our Troop has different neckerchiefs for each patrol; specifically because each patrol has their own colors drawn from their patrol flag, and so they wanted their neckers to coordinate with their flags in those very colors. So the "Mighty Knights" patrol uses black and silver in their flag and neckers, the "Savage Vikings" use brown and gold on both, et cetera et cetera. It has really helped cement the idea of patrol identity; I highly recommend this practice to those who haven't tried it!


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Hearken world, and listen up! There is no such word as "Webelo." If your son is an older Cub Scout, he is NOT a "Webelo!"

The singular of Webelos Scout is ... WEBELOS SCOUT!  That's it! Please take the extra half second and get it right! Thank you for indulging my little pet peeve!

 

Did I mention my obnoxious OCD?  :D 

 


#203 Gwaihir

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 09:48 AM

Our Troop has different neckerchiefs for each patrol; specifically because each patrol has their own colors drawn from their patrol flag, and so they wanted their neckers to coordinate with their flags in those very colors. So the "Mighty Knights" patrol uses black and silver in their flag and neckers, the "Savage Vikings" use brown and gold on both, et cetera et cetera. It has really helped cement the idea of patrol identity; I highly recommend this practice to those who haven't tried it!

 

I think it's great, wish we had done it as scouts back in the day.  We just used the standard Red with yellow piping.  Will keep that in the back pocket. 


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#204 NJCubScouter

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 09:15 AM

I think patrol neckerchiefs are a great idea, like large, square neckerchiefs and going back to registering patrols as "units."   So long as it has no financial impact, BSA would like those ideas too.

 

@TAHAWK, when were patrols registered as units?


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#205 TAHAWK

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 10:06 AM

@TAHAWK, when were patrols registered as units?

Until at least 1969.  Look, you can buy an old Neighborhood Patrol charter: http://www.scoutstuf...borhood-patrol/


Edited by TAHAWK, 01 June 2017 - 10:43 AM.

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#206 NJCubScouter

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 10:40 AM

Until at least 1969.  Look, you can buy an old Neighborhood Patrol charter: http://www.scoutstuf...orhood-patrol/ 

 

That link didn't work, I think you have an extra space or two at the end.  This worked: http://www.scoutstuf...borhood-patrol/

 

I have never heard of a charter for a patrol, nor do I recall hearing the term "neighborhood patrol", as opposed to just a "patrol".  I notice the document doesn't actually say the word "charter".  It says the patrol "has duly qualified and is registered with" the BSA.  I am not sure what that means and it does not say anything else of substance.  It seems to be a certificate that was given out in addition to a troop charter, because I know troops have had charters going back to the beginning.  


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#207 TAHAWK

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 10:44 AM

Did copy/paste again and now it works.  Sometimes, computers seem to me like the Mysteries of Mithras.


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#208 NJCubScouter

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:15 AM

I did some googling and found this which mentions Neighborhood Patrols, if I am interpreting this correctly they seem to have been part of something called "Rural Scouting."  

 

http://chestofbooks....hborhood_patrol

 

It says no CO or committee was required, just a Scoutmaster who would be approved by three "fathers" (presumably fathers of boys who are participating in the patrol, though it doesn't actually say that, and it doesn't say "parents", just "fathers".)

 

The only date I see in this document is 1938, as the year one of the photos was taken, so this document is probably either from then or shortly after that.


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#209 TAHAWK

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:34 AM

No sponsor

No Committee

"Scoutmaster is selected by three fathers from the community."

A few as two boys

 

 

"NEIGHBORHOOD PATROL: a small neighborhood group of from 2 to 8 Scouts may be organized as a 'Neighborhood Patrol."   A Neighborhood Patrol requires no sponsorship. Three fathers in the community must approve the Scoutmaster.  Meetings are held in homes or other suitable places as often as the membership desires to meet."

 

Boy's Life, June, 1938, at p. 27.

 

In several places, BSA literature suggests that a Neighborhood Patrol could be a sort of pre-troop.

 

But if you get a sponsor and Committee, no reason a patrol cannot register as a "troop" and operate as a patrol. We sure have numerous patrol-sized "troops" trying to operate as a troop.


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