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Boot repairs in Boundary Waters


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#1 Mike F2

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 01:56 PM

First, never attempt to use an old pair of cheap jungle boots a few years after the last trip.
My soles came completely off on days 1&2 (of 10).
For immediate repairs, we used some strips of bicycle inner tube and managed to get through the day.
At camp, we used Gorilla Glue and Gorilla Tape to fix the soles. On Day 9, one boot needed a little more attention, but got me through the trip! I also used a little Superglue gel to make sure the tape didn't start pulling off.
(That was the worst $35 I ever saved.)

I would love to post photo of the boots, but can't figure out how using iPhone.
I'm not really new to forum, but been off for about 8 years. Used to be Mike F - lost login info and it was associated with an old email address.
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#2 jjlash

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 08:36 AM

Wow - seems like you had a lot of repair items with you...bicycle inner tube AND gorilla glue AND gorilla tap AND super glue.  

 

I had the heal part of the sole come loose on about day 3 last year.  Duct tape was not going to hold it so I used paracord - down the inside of the boot, poked a hole through the sole and up the outside to tie together.  Good thing that worked because duct tape and paracord were all I carry for repairs.  Next step was to wear the camp shoes for the rest of the trip.


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#3 Stosh

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 09:05 AM

You may have been in camp, but welcome to the campfire, pull up a log and join in.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#4 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 10:38 AM

Let me guess, ROTHCO brand jungle boots?

 

I had a similar experience, except it was on a weekend canoe training trip that the soles came off. Week old ROTHCO jungle boots. Thankfully we had duct tape, and I was able to return them to get the ALTAMA USGI jungle boots. Those boots lasted for years, 15+, until they got lost in a move and I got a replacement pair.

 

Last time I did canoe training, some of the Scouts thought it was funny that I was wearing combat boots instead of water shoes. When 3 Scouts lost a shoe(s) and a few others had their shoes come off in the mud, they understood.

 

Finally

 

WELCOME TO DA FORUMS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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"Train 'em. Trust 'em. LET THEM LEAD!" William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt


#5 Stosh

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 10:45 AM

I have a pair of old Vietnam era jungle boots that I always use while canoeing and kayaking.  They look a bit worn (I don't polish them, but maybe I should) but they are just as good today as when I bought them.  These boots have made a lot of trips to the BWCA and I have no idea how many portage miles I have put on them, but it's been a lot.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#6 Mike F2

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 12:17 PM

Good quality equipment is always worth the cost, but most of my guys couldn't afford anything but the cheap imports. Since we were planning for over 100 miles, I wanted to be prepared for about anything.
First Aid Kit was much larger than repair kit. The superglue we used was actually part of that.

Cheers!
-Mike F
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#7 Stosh

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 12:25 PM

Good quality equipment is always worth the cost, but most of my guys couldn't afford anything but the cheap imports. Since we were planning for over 100 miles, I wanted to be prepared for about anything.
First Aid Kit was much larger than repair kit. The superglue we used was actually part of that.

Cheers!
-Mike F

 

Double socks and duct tape and one doesn't need a whole lot more in their First Aid kit.  I did 110 miles at Philmont and no blisters.  SM yelled at me for buying the "wrong" type of boots.  I didn't do the all leather boot, but went with a lightweight man-made composite boot.  Far more comfortable, not quite as ankle sturdy, but as long as I didn't twist an ankle I was okay.  The SM and boys suffered more with blisters than I did with twisted ankles.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#8 qwazse

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 12:34 PM

I find most adhesives give way without heat and pressure. Now if the 1st aid kit came with a little plastique and detonators ... :ph34r:


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#9 Stosh

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 01:51 PM

I find most adhesives give way without heat and pressure. Now if the 1st aid kit came with a little plastique and detonators ... :ph34r:

 

I found that taping my heel where it would rub, another across the ball of my foot and another over the top of my toes before putting on a thin nylon sock and then a heavy wool sock solved all my blister problems.  Well, I don't get blisters, so I don't have that problem.  Even with sweaty feet of the heavy sock in the summer time and the occasional soaking from walking through creeks, the duct tape always stayed in place quite nicely because the nylon sock kept the corners from rolling back up, etc.  The nylon would rub on the tape (not skin) and what little friction heat was not enough to cause blisters.  However the sock rubbing on skin has the double whammy of both heat and abrasion going on. 


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#10 qwazse

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 02:45 PM

@Stosh, I was talking about a blown out heel or sole of a boot.

 

For actual feet, yes the duct tape, and/or a thin sock layer (I've become addicted to merino wool liners from the army surplus store, but they didn't have them this weekend :( ) will do the trick on most people's skin.

 

Please, everybody who may have means to acquire it, only use incendiaries on the boot WHILE IT IS REMOVED FROM THE FOOT, and at appropriate safe distances from any body part (yours or your buddy's) as advised by your munitions instructor! :mellow: :eek:


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#11 Stosh

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 03:35 PM

My bad.  Misunderstood   We had one scout that had a simple solution go knee deep in the mud and come up with no boot.  He did that 3 days into a 9 day float in the BWCA.  Spent the rest of the trip wearing water shoes.  He was not a happy camper.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)





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