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Thoughts on unit using social media and privacy?


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#21 Gwaihir

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 02:40 PM

@Stosh, you can have someone hang around your unit any time and get names, locations, school info, etc. Social media makes it easier, but is someone wants to get the info they can.

 

Agreed, but that's like saying, "if someone wanted to get into your house, they will, so why bother locking your doors and windows at night".  


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#22 mashmaster

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:50 PM

we use a private system for photos, calendar, and communication.  I do see the parents post them to facebook later.    Facebook, instagram, snapchat .....  all can be used in bad ways and good ways.  Personally, I prefer for public pages to show where the boys have been vs. where they are going.


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#23 Col. Flagg

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:53 PM

Agreed, but that's like saying, "if someone wanted to get into your house, they will, so why bother locking your doors and windows at night".  

 

LOL...sort of. But to continue the analogy, @Stosh has a castle, moat with alligators, guards, laser trip wires and Dementors flying overhead protecting his house.

 

I think by following the BSA policies one "locks the doors" and keeps a weather eye out. That's our job as Scouters. If mom tags Junior in a photo and someone get a hold of it, that's on mom, not us. 


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#24 Col. Flagg

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:58 PM

Yep. My first response was Oh, facebook should manage content, not create it. Anyway, Google "facebook auto tagging" or try this mess:

https://www.google.c...PKGMkiUa0NA9New

 

Wow...that's scary. That means that FB is keeping a database when you tag someone and using their facial scanning algorithm to find their face in other photos you post. That's interesting the ACLU has not been all over this issue, but I guess they're too busy doing other non-essential stuff. 

 

So I could post a picture of you, tag you and then your face is in FB's system and you can do nothing about it. That's a HUGE infringement of one's civil liberties and right to privacy. I notice that they have not rolled this out to Germany and a few other countries that have strict privacy laws.

 

Time to change my account to German FB.


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#25 Stosh

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 05:42 PM

We go through all the hoops to make sure the requirements on Cyber activity is carefully checked off for advancement, yet the real problem often times is the parents.  Seriously  I don't want to know what you had for dinner, I don't care how cute your kid is, I get tired of chain posts, I I don't click "like" because I don't want FB and Google to target market me with stupid ads that get blocked anyway.  I saw someone the other day on the "Off the Grid" account on how to connect to FB with only solar generators.  Really?  I thought you wanted off the grid, don't you understand what that means????  Sometimes I wonder if our kids know more about this stuff than the adults to or maybe the whole lot needs some Cyber training.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#26 Chadamus

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 06:30 PM

@Stosh i'm with you on this one. I don't want to know what they had for dinner either. Or lunch or breakfast.

Share a dutch oven recipe with me tho and i'm all ears!


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#27 Gwaihir

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:06 PM

 

I think by following the BSA policies one "locks the doors" and keeps a weather eye out. That's our job as Scouters. If mom tags Junior in a photo and someone get a hold of it, that's on mom, not us. 

 

oh I agree.  But then, the decision is placed on the parents, not the organization.  


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#28 Gwaihir

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:11 PM

Wow...that's scary. That means that FB is keeping a database when you tag someone and using their facial scanning algorithm to find their face in other photos you post. That's interesting the ACLU has not been all over this issue, but I guess they're too busy doing other non-essential stuff. 

 

So I could post a picture of you, tag you and then your face is in FB's system and you can do nothing about it. That's a HUGE infringement of one's civil liberties and right to privacy. I notice that they have not rolled this out to Germany and a few other countries that have strict privacy laws.

 

Time to change my account to German FB.

 

Except that it's still a gray area in the US.  1. because it's a private organization and you sign terms of agreement before using their service. 2. it's a public space and no citizen has the expectation of privacy in public. (this is where the gray area is because the ramifications of no privacy in a public square are the 25-50 people in your immediate vicinity and they're using their memory.  The net is using advanced facial recognition algorithms and billions can see you).  The EU has 95/46/EC, which is strict data protection and privacy law, so you don't see this as much over there.  

yes, it is scary, hence the concern for minors. :) 


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#29 Stosh

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:23 PM

Even as adults one has to be careful.  As an American Red Cross volunteer I am present at all kinds of disasters even around the country.  Present are always the media with their cameras.  Before taking any pictures they always get a signed permission slip to photograph or tape your image.  Do they do this out of respect?  Do they do it out of fear of a lawsuit?  I dunno, but they do it anyway.  I was at a large apartment fire just last week and they panned the area I was standing in next to a Red Cross vehicle and I was wearing a Red Cross vest of identification.  They came with a permission slip and asked me to sign it.  I asked what would happen if I didn't.  They said that part of the video would be edited out or masked.  They are VERY careful with this issue.  The BSA policy as well as individuals need to be too.


Edited by Stosh, 17 February 2017 - 08:24 PM.

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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#30 Cambridgeskip

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 03:56 AM

We go through all the hoops to make sure the requirements on Cyber activity is carefully checked off for advancement, yet the real problem often times is the parents.  Seriously  I don't want to know what you had for dinner, I don't care how cute your kid is, I get tired of chain posts, I I don't click "like" because I don't want FB and Google to target market me with stupid ads that get blocked anyway.  I saw someone the other day on the "Off the Grid" account on how to connect to FB with only solar generators.  Really?  I thought you wanted off the grid, don't you understand what that means????  Sometimes I wonder if our kids know more about this stuff than the adults to or maybe the whole lot needs some Cyber training.

I think that the kids know more in terms of accessing what they want to access and filtering out the junk (the silly chain messages etc) than adults do. I do think though that the kids need more training in how to protect themselves on line. Some are really quite naive. 


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#31 Stosh

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 07:56 AM

I think that the kids know more in terms of accessing what they want to access and filtering out the junk (the silly chain messages etc) than adults do. I do think though that the kids need more training in how to protect themselves on line. Some are really quite naive. 

 

Om another thread here on the forum, It was pointed out to me some concern about my use of the word stupid.  The definition of that word refers to the type of person who operates out of a lack of intelligence, (meaning knowledge or information) and/or common sense.  In this case a less mature person can be or cause a problem because they lack sufficient information or knowledge about something yet have no problem with common sense.  On the other hand a person might have a tremendous amount of knowledge but with an immature level of common sense and still make poor choices..  Either case have the tendency to produce stupid results and thus a problem.

 

Therefore you are correct in that naivete and/or lack of understanding is not a situation one wishes to put young people into without proper knowledge (which many already have) but without a sufficient level of common sense to be able to make choices about it in a more mature manner.

 

When it comes to the cyber world, one needs both to protect themselves and those around them.  It's a new frontier which has appeared only in recent years and our young people have yet to develop an appropriate level of common sense to go along with the ever growing knowledge that has presented itself.

 

When I work with the cyber world, or the world of strangers, or dealing with situations in the "real world" in which others live, developing mature character in our young men it requires me to be attentive to both the knowledge and the common sense to use that information wisely.  People are trusting me to provide them with the proper knowledge so they can further develop or at least guide them through the years of early maturity to be able to make good choices. 

 

When I tell a 5 year old the stove is hot, they may understand that, but like any other inquisitive child, learning to deal with the world around them, may not have built sufficient trust in the person telling them a stove is hot and will then further explore for themselves and test out that by touching the stove anyway.  It's all a natural part of a person's development.  Now if the child tests the stove when it's not on they conclude the person was not trustworthy and will correctly conclude the stove is not hot.  However if the stove is hot they get a boost of common sense.  and will conclude that even when cold they may not wish to choose to touch it.  Either way they have not acquired the knowledge as to when the stove is off or on and further instruction in information is still needed.  It's a process, not a snapshot in time.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)





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