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How to motivate the scouts to fundraise


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#21 fred johnson

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 11:27 AM

We annually sell mulch for fundraising but this year, only 3 scouts have bothered to sell.  How do you motivate them to try?  

 

Motivating Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts is very different.  

 

Cub Scouts get motivated with prizes, recognition and something special like a water dunk tank for leaders or pies in the face or ....

 

Boy Scouts ... yeah ... good luck with that.  If you are selling mulch, does that mean the scouts have to spread the mulch too?  Great idea for a fundraiser but you almost need a group you can require participation from such as a football team.  


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#22 mashmaster

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 10:11 PM

Motivating Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts is very different.  

 

Cub Scouts get motivated with prizes, recognition and something special like a water dunk tank for leaders or pies in the face or ....

 

Boy Scouts ... yeah ... good luck with that.  If you are selling mulch, does that mean the scouts have to spread the mulch too?  Great idea for a fundraiser but you almost need a group you can require participation from such as a football team.  

Yes the scouts spread the mulch.  It is an all hands on deck day for the troop.  They actually end up having a good time on the spreading day.  It is harder to get them motivated for the sale part of it than the spreading.


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#23 Wëlënakwsu

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 11:24 PM

If I understand correctly... selling is done individually.  It's likley turnout woud be better if fundraising is a group activiity. XMAS trees, car wash, pancake breakfast, spagetti dinner etc.

More fun, teamwork, leadership opportunity for PL, SPL, Scribe...etc.


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#24 Stosh

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 11:45 PM

I often wonder how much learning really goes on with fundraising.  The boys never really know the money that's passed around in the project.  The only money they see is what they have to turn in at the end of the door-to-door sales.  Even then the boys aren't trusted enough to get it straight.  Parents are motivated to fund-raise because then they don't have to pay for their own kid's scout activities..  After going out selling, the money comes back, the adults skim off the top on the profits, hand out a few beads and trinkets to the younger boy because they are into the instant gratification kind of thingy, But for the older boys for the older boys the ISA's can be used to "build up an account" of moneys the adults tell them they earned, sans the 1099. 

 

I really don't think many of these "lessons" I really want to teach.  Now if they are going to have fun serving up a pancake supper the parents plan out (they do it anyway, the boys can't prep food by state law) I can see them having a lot of fun with that.  Of course they could also go down to the Salvation Army and serve, too, but they won't get a cash hit on their ISA's, they'd have to have that fun without getting a personal kickback.   Anyway it's hard to justify a service project credit when the boys get paid for their work.

 

If the boys want to learn the process, they can plan what they want to do, do it and then keep everything for their patrol.  Of course they will have to budget it all out and make plans, and do all sorts of things the adults do, but if they are doing it only for their patrol, it can be done on a lot smaller scale where the lessons can be learned and they actually learn the lessons as boy led.  Every patrol has to develop a budge and make plans.  A lot of times that kinda gets in the way of the boys having fun, so it doesn't get done.  Even a small fund-raiser for a patrol would require some effort on the part of the boys.  If they did do it, the motivation would have to come from themselves and they would have to take responsibility in the process.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#25 blw2

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 11:05 AM

......Parents are motivated to fund-raise because then they don't have to pay for their own kid's scout activities..  ......

I'm actually in the opposite camp.... I have a samll part of me that is embarrassed that I'm sending my kid out to bother you about buying something you probably don't want to pay for my kid to do something fun.  I can pay my own way, and in my mind that means covering my responsibilities

 

yeah, I get that the idea is about instilling that same feeling in my son, but honestly I really do not think he's getting any of that from scout fundraising, or band fundraising, or any of it.....none, zero, zilch

where he'll learn the lesson best is figuring out how to earn some money on his own to buy something he wants.


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#26 Chadamus

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 12:30 AM

@mashmaster The camp card show and sell was . . . disappointing. Four initially signed up. One Scout showed upon time. One backed out at the last minute. Another was an hour late. No-show from the fourth. On top of all this, a Troop from another district insisted they had signed up for the same time slot. The one Scout did his best. Sold a few. I was unable to attend the show and sell, but I voiced my displeasure to the Council's DE after I heard about the situation.

So, I have no answer to the title of your thread! I'm looking for answers myself at this point....


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#27 Torchwood

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 11:23 AM

We sell holiday greens each year. There is an expected minimum of $300 in sales per Scout (not that hard at $15 per wreath, etc.). We have incentives for going over and above that minimum, and we also ask that families who have Scouts that they allow to not participate in the sales write a check for $150 (our net on the sales minimum). We get about 2/3 of our Scouts to actually sell, so I really can't complain too much. We use the Scout Law tactic, and also try to appeal to their sense of fair play with the family budget. But given that the Troop is in a mainly affluent suburban town, that doesn't wash with some kids. Their parents would rather write the check than fight with Tommy Scout.


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#28 CalicoPenn

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 01:25 PM

Question - have you asked the Scouts that are not participating why they aren't participating?  I think too often we spin our wheels trying to figure things out and never think to just ask.


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#29 Torchwood

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 01:45 PM

In our case, it is a combination of too much family income and the perception that some of the older Scouts have that since they are no longer cute 11 and 12 year old boys, that they won't be successful going door to door. The reality is that people want to help, and all it takes for them to do so is for someone to actually ask them.


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