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#41 fred johnson

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 11:16 AM

What does that even mean? Most of the world doesn't have scout units that need to be "chartered."

 

BSA uses the concept of "charter" to put ownership onto someone other that BSA.  BSA does not own units; does not own their equipment and does not own their bank accounts.  Charters select leadership, membership and provide resources such as meeting locations and storage.  

 

On the flip side, it is meant to limit BSA liability.  Legally, units exist under their charters, not under BSA.

 

Charter organizations are usually churches, but can really be any organization wanting to run a program for youth:  schools, business, Lions clubs, VFWs, community groups, etc.  


Edited by fred johnson, 28 February 2017 - 11:29 AM.

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#42 Peregrinator

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 03:54 PM

It was the Pope's decision.

Where do you get that idea? Not even Pope Francis would be such a micromanager. If you mean that the KofC responded to something the Pope said by deciding no longer to charter BSA units, that might be accurate. But there's no indication that the Pope asked the KofC not to charter BSA units any more. He probably is not even aware that such a thing as chartering a scout unit actually exists.


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#43 Peregrinator

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 03:56 PM

IMHO, this is also the right move.  "I think" huge deep pockets (assets) attracts the attention of those wanting to connect mistakes (crimes) to those deep pockets.  IMHO, overly deep pockets perverts justice.  If a parish fails to oversee a program, that parish should be sued, but not the whole nation.

 

I have no position on whether this was the right move or the wrong one for the KofC. I'm simply pointing out that it was their decision; as far as I know no one forced them to make it.


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#44 David CO

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 04:12 PM

I have no position on whether this was the right move or the wrong one for the KofC. I'm simply pointing out that it was their decision; as far as I know no one forced them to make it.

 

No, it was not their decision.

 

In addition to giving up their Boy Scout units, the KC's were also instructed to begin phasing out its own youth program, the Columbian Squires.


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#45 Peregrinator

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 04:40 PM

No, it was not their decision.
 
In addition to giving up their Boy Scout units, the KC's were also instructed to begin phasing out its own youth program, the Columbian Squires.


So the KofC was not telling the truth when they said,
 
"The Board of Direc­tors has thus decid­ed that as part of this new ini­tia­tive, local units of the Knights of Colum­bus will no longer spon­sor Boy Scout troops."
 
?
 
Even the initiative to which this refers, "Build­ing the Domes­tic Church While Strength­en­ing Our Parish," is not a Catholic Church initiative, but a KofC one.


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#46 TAHAWK

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 04:45 PM

Not sure what this means to mthe discussion, but thus sayeth the G:

 

"May a charter school be religious in nature? No. As public schools, charter schools must be non-religious in their programs, admissions policies, governance, employment practices and all other operations, and the charter school’s curriculum must be completely secular. As with other public schools, charter schools may not provide religious instruction, but they may teach about religion from a secular perspective. And though charter schools must be neutral with respect to religion, they may play an active role in teaching civic values. The fact that some of these values are also held by religions does not make it unlawful to teach them in a charter school. Furthermore, as discussed below, faithbased and religious organizations can be involved with charter schools in many ways, and religious expression by students is allowed in charter schools to the same extent as in other public schools. See also the Department’s guidance on Constitutionally protected prayer in public elementary and secondary schools of ESEA, available at: http://www.ed.gov/po...ools/index.html.

 

May charter schools enter into partnerships with religious organizations to provide secular services? Yes. Like other public schools, charter schools may enter into partnerships with community groups for secular purposes, such as tutoring or recreational activities. Religious groups may be partners for these types of activities so long as charter schools select partners without regard to their religious affiliation, ensure that no public funds are used for religious purposes, and do not engage in or encourage religious activity. Charter schools may not limit participation in the partnership to religious groups or certain religious groups, and they may not select students or encourage or discourage student participation with particular partners based on the religious or secular nature of the organization."

 

 

And it's SOME avowed atheists who are excluded.  Not all.  BSA's policy is, for pragmatic reasons, clear as mud.


Edited by TAHAWK, 01 March 2017 - 04:48 PM.

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#47 krikkitbot

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 02:59 PM

No, it was not their decision.

 

In addition to giving up their Boy Scout units, the KC's were also instructed to begin phasing out its own youth program, the Columbian Squires.

 

I wonder if that is a local decision. My sons were being heavily recruited for Columbian Squires last fall. 


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