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Gene Cernan


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#1 mashmaster

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 04:26 PM

Gene was a 2nd Class scout.
 
Watching the Mercury 7
 
Gene Cernan’s wife asked:  Would you like to do that?
 
Gene's response:  I would love to do it, just give me the chance.   But by the time I get good enough, by the time I get qualified, by the time I meet all the requirements, there won’t
Be anything left to do.  All the Pioneering will be over.  Don’t ever short change yourself, you never ever know what fate has in store.  I got a call out of the blue, it was NASA and asked to come try out.
 
Cernan tells his grandchildren: “Don’t ever count yourself out. You’ll never know how good you are unless you try. Dream the impossible and go out and make it happen. “I walked on the moon. What can’t you do?”

Edited by NJCubScouter, 16 January 2017 - 08:48 PM.
Edited at poster's (implied) request

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#2 NJCubScouter

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 05:09 PM

Interesting quotes. [Redacted after correcting original post]
 
As all of the news reports today have been pointing out, he has the distinction of being the last person, so far, to stand on the Moon.  I remember his missions from when I was a pre-teen and teenager.  What is a little disappointing is that it has now been slightly more than 44 years since Gene Cernan walked on the moon, and we have no current prospect of going back.  If you had told me when I was 14 years old that that would be the case, I would have said it's impossible.    By 2016 there will be passenger flights to the Moon every week, not to mention the flying cars.  Where are the flying cars?  
 
Anyway... R.I.P. Gene Cernan.

Edited by NJCubScouter, 16 January 2017 - 08:49 PM.

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#3 mashmaster

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 05:46 PM

Yes Gene, I think my brain confused him with Jim Lovell for some reason.   I wish I could edit the post....

Edited by NJCubScouter, 16 January 2017 - 08:51 PM.
Well, I could, and I did :)

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#4 qwazse

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 05:57 AM

We might not have walked on the moon since then, but we've enabled millions to survive a variety of coronary diseases and cancers (among other diseases).

Worth the trade-off, I think.
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#5 blw2

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 09:38 AM

Interesting quotes. [Redacted after correcting original post]
 
As all of the news reports today have been pointing out, he has the distinction of being the last person, so far, to stand on the Moon.  I remember his missions from when I was a pre-teen and teenager.  What is a little disappointing is that it has now been slightly more than 44 years since Gene Cernan walked on the moon, and we have no current prospect of going back.  If you had told me when I was 14 years old that that would be the case, I would have said it's impossible.    By 2016 there will be passenger flights to the Moon every week, not to mention the flying cars.  Where are the flying cars?  
 
Anyway... R.I.P. Gene Cernan.

 

I had not heard the news.... I'm saddened by it for sure.

 

I had the pleasure of hearing Captain Cernan speak once.  It was a rather small audience at Airventure several years ago.  He spoke at length about the very subject you touched on NJcubScouter.  

How sad it is that we have not been continuing to explore more than we have.  Also as I recall he spoke about the way things had become so routine.... how the world stopped to watch those first missions, but by the time of his last mission.... and for the majority of the shuttle missions, it was old hat.  It's like many people weren't aware it was even happening.  I don't recall it all, but as I remember it was a very nice motivational talk encouraging further exploration.

 

I hope that someday someone will go back and see his bootprints that are surely still up there.


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#6 SSScout

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 10:57 AM

Yeah,  it is hard to "wow" the kids today.  Transformers seem more real to some kids than real space missions, with real humans.   Pictures of a comet, or the surface of Pluto?  So what?

 

My mother talked about watching the dirigible Hindenburg fly over Boston on its way to Lakehurst, NJ.   She(and my dad) lived to see the creation of the modern automobile, transpacific airliners,  humans walking on the moon ( I stayed up late to watch that happen on REAL TV . Thank you, Mr. Cronkite). 

Can we talk to our kids (my youngest is 22) about what we watched?  What we witnessed?    Make an impression?   Can we help them learn from our mistakes, not to make them again? And again? 


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#7 Stosh

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 11:24 AM

Let me see.  We can keep a perpetual space station operational (no gravity, hard on the human body).  There are grandiose ideas to colonize Mars, but over the past 40+ years there have been no practice colonies on the moon.  One would think that the middle step should have been taken, unless of course the conspiracy theorists are correct in that there's something about the moon that keeps it off-limits.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#8 NJCubScouter

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 01:10 PM

We might not have walked on the moon since then, but we've enabled millions to survive a variety of coronary diseases and cancers (among other diseases).

Worth the trade-off, I think.

 

Trade-off implies we couldn't have done both.  I see no reason to believe that.


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#9 NJCubScouter

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 01:12 PM

One would think that the middle step should have been taken, unless of course the conspiracy theorists are correct in that there's something about the moon that keeps it off-limits.

 

It must be that monolith buried right under the surface, with dimensions 1x4x9.


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#10 qwazse

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 01:25 PM

@NJCubScouter, we really couldn't. The dollars required to address Nixon's cancer initiative alone eclipsed several moon shots over the years. Remember the "can't even cure the common cold" phrase?

Science fiction makes keeping space-bound humans happy and healthy look easy. But it really is rocket science.

Let me see.  We can keep a perpetual space station operational (no gravity, hard on the human body).  There are grandiose ideas to colonize Mars, but over the past 40+ years there have been no practice colonies on the moon.  One would think that the middle step should have been taken, unless of course the conspiracy theorists are correct in that there's something about the moon that keeps it off-limits.

Radiation, dust (fun fact: the moon smells like cordite), meteor impacts, and water prospects are the main impediments. It's taken this long to solve most of those without actually killing our best astronauts in the process. (As it is, we lost enough getting them up and back from orbit.)

 

Of course there is some truth to the fact that political will has gotten in the way, but the broader story is how the populace has extracted lemons from lemonade.

 

Compared to the span between the Vikings and the rise of European circum-navigation, things are moving at a fairly good clip.


Edited by qwazse, 17 January 2017 - 01:33 PM.

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#11 NJCubScouter

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 01:44 PM

Science fiction makes keeping space-bound humans happy and healthy look easy. But it really is rocket science.

 

I understand the difference between science fiction and science fact.  I understand that "Star Trek" can't happen until someone disproves Einstein so we can travel faster than light.  And even on something much more mundane like traveling to the closest planet, I understand there are difficult challenges to overcome.  But I feel like we haven't really tried.

 

If there really is a choice between, say, eliminating cancer and traveling to Mars, I would choose eliminating cancer every day of the week.  But I don't think that's the choice.  Maybe the cure for cancer is waiting for us on Mars.  (Probably not.)


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#12 Stosh

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 02:42 PM

Maybe traveling faster than the speed of light is not the solution, maybe just warping time and space will do the trick.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#13 David CO

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 03:51 PM

Manned lunar space flights have become obsolete.  We have robots to do that job. 

 

If modern computer chips were available 50 years ago, Gene Cernan would have never walked on the moon.  There would have been no need for him to do so.

 

Yes, it is getting much harder to impress young people.  That is why the Barnum & Bailey Circus is shutting down.


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#14 qwazse

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 03:58 PM

... If there really is a choice between, say, eliminating cancer and traveling to Mars, I would choose eliminating cancer every day of the week.  But I don't think that's the choice.  Maybe the cure for cancer is waiting for us on Mars.  (Probably not.)

Not there, but possibly along the way.

Figuring out how to make folk's cells robust against radiation damage is as much part of cancer treatment delivery as it is of astronautics.

Figuring out how to corral radiation around a "safe capsule" has even broader applications in development of medical devices.

 

I'm not as glib as David CO about the supremacy of robotics. It's taken tremendous effort to get state-of-the-art probes to do a fraction of the jobs that manned missions could do.

 

The "long road" -- i.e. being earthly minded for a couple of generations -- is giving us tools for very long journeys which will help our grandchildren be of some heavenly good.


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#15 NJCubScouter

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 04:05 PM

Maybe traveling faster than the speed of light is not the solution, maybe just warping time and space will do the trick.

 

Yeah, "just".  Well, as long as it's easy.


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#16 NJCubScouter

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 04:16 PM

Manned lunar space flights have become obsolete.  We have robots to do that job. 

 

If modern computer chips were available 50 years ago, Gene Cernan would have never walked on the moon.  There would have been no need for him to do so.

 

I think the idea at the time was that that was just the first step toward something greater.  I think there is some benefit to mankind reaching beyond this planet.  Call me an idealist.  Call me a Star Trek fan.  Whatever.


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#17 SSScout

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 04:47 PM

Here is where it really started:   https://www.youtube....h?v=ZWJrvT9sTPk

 

Even has original commercials.  

 

You can get it on DVD, too.   STEM movie night?  A double feature !    DESTINATION MOON:  http://www.dailymoti...m/video/x3m1lrf

 

and    IN THE SHADOW OF THE MOON  https://www.youtube....h?v=h9d9-pHZzIE

 

Scouts have their own popcorn, right?  


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#18 Stosh

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:10 AM

Manned lunar space flights have become obsolete.  We have robots to do that job. 

 

If modern computer chips were available 50 years ago, Gene Cernan would have never walked on the moon.  There would have been no need for him to do so.

 

Yes, it is getting much harder to impress young people.  That is why the Barnum & Bailey Circus is shutting down.

 

Naw, PETA took the circus out of the circus. 


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#19 Stosh

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:25 AM

Yeah, "just".  Well, as long as it's easy.

 

LIke Jules Verne, his science fiction became science reality on many occasions.  Star Trek, too, and what someone imagines, someone else makes real.  Been happening on a regular basis now for about 100 years.  A pace faster than any time in human history.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#20 NJCubScouter

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:24 PM

LIke Jules Verne, his science fiction became science reality on many occasions.  Star Trek, too, and what someone imagines, someone else makes real.  Been happening on a regular basis now for about 100 years.  A pace faster than any time in human history.

 

Listen, I'm all for people trying to figure out how to warp space and time and stuff.  When you figure it out, let us know.

 

When Stephen Hawking made his guest appearance on Star Trek: The Next Generation, they took him on a tour of the set, and when they got to the "warp core", he smiled and said, "We're working on that."


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