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Twenty Skills that are Dying Out


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#21 blw2

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 09:56 AM

One of my negative memories from my days as a scout was getting tortured by the "camp police" about not having a cold fire pit.  You had to dig down .... but you could still feel some warmth in the damp sand.... so we were rejected repeatedly.... and I think we lost points for something or another

My buddy and I had to worked for what seemed like an eternity to get it "correct".... for what as a boy, and even now as an adult, seems just plain silly to me.  We were breaking camp and just wanted to go home.....

It was a case of following the "book" and not common sense.


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#22 Stosh

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 09:58 AM

At summer camp I always have a "project" to do while I'm hanging around camp and one year I made a small rocket stove that I used to do all my cooking (camp had no mess hall).  It worked great and I used FAR less wood than the boys using the Shepherd's stove.  Both were stoves using wood as a fuel source and even with a burn ban, they were allowed.

 

Unfortunately stoves don't make very good campfires, but they will help reduce the use of expensive fuel.  I have been told in the literature, that rocket stoves use about 8 times less wood fuel for the same amount of heat energy.  Getting a fire of tinder and kindling going gets one a cup of coffee quicker than building a cook fire and waiting for the logs to die down to coals.  It takes a lot of wood to get a Shepherd's stove up to cooking temperature as well.


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#23 Ankylus

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 02:33 PM

I read that either West Point or Annapolis is going to reinstate curriculum w/r to orienteering because of concerns that some day the GPS will be knocked out and that the military will once again have to navigate by map and compass.

 

That list makes it apparent why the academies like to admit Boy Scouts and especially Eagle scouts.


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#24 eagle90

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 01:52 PM

While at an indoor campout this last weekend, I wrote out some instructions for patrol leaders.  Two of them (both high school juniors) could not read the notes because it was in cursive and not printed!  Unbelievable.  They aid they were never taught how to write, just print.

 

Dale


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#25 blw2

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 02:36 PM

my 3rd grade daughter is learning it.

but

I can barely read or write it myself.  I started using nothing but printing in high school when I was taking drafting classes.  This was the days of pencil or ink on paper using T-Squares and triangles.  For mechanical drawings, we were taught to print in all caps, and had to re-learn to print in all caps "block letters".  

TOM Q. VAXY

I haven't printed that neatly in a long time, but I still print in all caps.  Never have seen a point in cursive.

 

I always think of my mom when it comes to cursive.... she would write so slowly and so consistently.  Still very hard to read though.... what's the point?


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#26 Chadamus

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 05:30 PM

I always think of my mom when it comes to cursive.... she would write so slowly and so consistently.  Still very hard to read though.... what's the point?

In theory? It's faster.

My mom is the same. Palmer method: painfully slow and methodical, yet beautiful at the same time.

I print in all caps like you.


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#27 Stosh

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 05:32 PM

When I was in 3rd grade I had terrible penmanship.  My mother made me practice, EVERY DAY!  I got to the point where I really started to like doing it and eventually now I do calligraphy just for fun.  I can also take dictation using speed writing and can go back and read what I wrote.  :)  I have a fountain pen (made of deer antler) in my pocket as I speak.  I had it custom made.  The fella said, what wood should I use, I said what about deer antler.  He said, "No problem".   I love the wide tip of a fountain pen!  The only downside to this whole thing is every one says I write "like a girl".  Maybe so, but no one has ever come to me and said they can't read what I have written.  By the way, with the speed writing (which most people can't read, something like shorthand, but easier to learn), I can write normal cursive as fast if not faster than I can type and still be able to read it.


Edited by Stosh, 12 January 2017 - 05:33 PM.

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#28 MattR

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 12:25 AM

I think the Constitution is beautifully written. It's all cursive.

 

I write in cursive because it's easier on my hands. Printing is carpal tunnel just waiting to happen with my hand going up and down so much. It is slower and requires more concentration, but it helps me think before I write.


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#29 blw2

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 09:46 AM

'Speed Writing' is not something I'm familiar with.... although i do write pretty fast  :D

but IMO it sounds like something that should be taught ahead of cursive

  seems that it would be useful for taking notes in class or in a business mtg, an all sorts of other times in life that such a thing would be useful.

 

I'm a private pilot, although i'm sad to admit I haven't flown in many years.  Now days we get plain language weather printouts, but back in those days we learned to read and write the codes and abbreviations that the weather service (and FAA) use.....as well as a abbreviation or code system for writing routes, wayponts, etc...

It was very handy to know this sort of "shorthand" when jotting down a note on our knee board about something the controller just told us while bouncing around in the clouds doing about 4 things at once and all while thinking ahead two or three steps along the route


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#30 Stosh

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 08:40 PM

Speed writing is a system developed with certain rules that leave out letters and focus on sounds.  All the vowels are omitted   There are no capital letters.  I's are not dotted and T's are not crossed.  The letter b is without a loop, but a b with a loop is really BL

 

S n rdr to s, 2 b r nt 2 b tht s th kwstn t s rtn s sch.

 

Usually if one takes notes in class, within a day, it is rather easy to transcribe.  As time passes, some of the context may get lost and one would need to struggle more.

 

Modern computer shorthand LOL, SUL, IMHO, CU L8R are all textual keyboard similar ideals to cursive speed handwriting.


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Stosh

 

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#31 UncleP

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 02:38 AM

POLL FROM LONDON BOAT SHOW:

 

I heard of another poll done in London, regarding the loss of practical skills by people.  Shown below is a copy of an article on the poll.

 

 

A survey shows millennials are missing out on practical skills such as map reading or fishing, compared to their grandparents’ generation.

More than half of young adults were unable to tie a single knot and 40 per cent had never swum in open water, despite Britain being an island nation.

The poll, conducted ahead of the London Boat Show, found simple life skills have been left behind with advances in technology.

Researchers also found that most people under the age of 44 prefer to use Google Maps and Sat Navs to get around, but half of over-55s stick to a paper street map.

Just a third of the 2,000 surveyed know how to spark a flame by natural means, with less than a third having caught their own fish or seafood.

Those born before 1950 were also three times more likely to be able to tie a sheepshank knot compared with those born in the 1990s. And the survey also revealed that 44 per cent have never actually been camping.

A London Boat Show spokeswoman said: “Despite the rise of TV shows such as I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here and Bear Grylls: Born Survivor, young people lack basic survival skills such as building a fire or catching food.”


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#32 Eagledad

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 10:38 AM

Yes, the London poll hints at why scouting is changing, even in the U.S.

 

It wasn't all that long ago that our council calculated that over 70 percent of new adult leaders never had a scouting or weekend tent camping experience as a youth. Honestly I think the number is closer to 80 percent. So as we have these training, patrol method and boy run discussions, we need to keep in mind that new adults reading our post have almost no skills for outdoor camping with a group of boys. While patrol method appears simple in its description, it is extremely complicated to apply for adults with no scouting experience.

 

Barry


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"Experience is the hardest teacher. It gives the test first, then the lesson."


#33 Chadamus

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 10:55 AM

Even for some with Scouting experience, Barry. Finger pointed squarely at myself!
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#34 Eagledad

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 11:38 AM

Even for some with Scouting experience, Barry. Finger pointed squarely at myself!

Yes, maybe, but we found that adults with a youth scouting experience had two to three year advantage in leading a troop. Skills are big part of that, but the confidence of just camping in the woods with scouts is a big advantage as well.

 

Barry


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"Experience is the hardest teacher. It gives the test first, then the lesson."


#35 Gwaihir

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:50 PM

 

Darn socks?  When I started wearing 100% wool socks as an adult, I learned it was easy to repair those expensive socks rather than toss'em to the rag bin.

 

agreed, ive found that darning wool socks is a cheaper way to keep them running than buying new.  I have some really nice pairs and with the exception of some fixable holes.  Now I keep the new ones I get for Christmas in the closet till the old ones have been fixed a couple of times. 


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#36 Chadamus

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 12:55 PM

@Eagledad Absolutely. Even with all my experience as a youth, I was a few months into my role as ASM before i felt like i was getting it right. The difference between Cubs and Boys is like day and night. My son's journey through Cubs deprogrammed me. Getting back into the Patrol Method mindset took time.

Edited by Chadamus, 18 January 2017 - 12:57 PM.

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#37 blw2

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 03:05 PM

Yes, the London poll hints at why scouting is changing, even in the U.S.

 

It wasn't all that long ago that our council calculated that over 70 percent of new adult leaders never had a scouting or weekend tent camping experience as a youth. Honestly I think the number is closer to 80 percent. So as we have these training, patrol method and boy run discussions, we need to keep in mind that new adults reading our post have almost no skills for outdoor camping with a group of boys. While patrol method appears simple in its description, it is extremely complicated to apply for adults with no scouting experience.

 

Barry

 

you know, I think the thing that really cemented the understanding of patrol method for me was actually very basic and easy.  A quick and easy read.... BP's Aides to Scoutmastership.  that one book told me more about it than days and days of official required BSA training has.

 

I had scouting experience as a youth, but admittedly only a couple years and it wasn't necessarily in a strong troop either.....  THAT I am assuming is the problem in relying on youth experience for a scouter.  There is a whole spectrum between really bad and really great, and likely very few troop are really great so most folks pick up some bad assumptions and habits along the way.


Edited by blw2, 18 January 2017 - 03:06 PM.

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#38 perdidochas

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 04:32 PM

#14 Recall a friend or relative’s phone number from memory.  How about home numbers?

 

I am shocked by the number of the scouts in my troop who do not know their home phone number.  They rely on their smart phones.

My sons don't remember having a home phone number.   That said, they both knew both my cell phone number and my wife's (so they met that requirement at least for two numbers)


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#39 perdidochas

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 04:35 PM

Their are alot of safety concerns anymore with fires. I remember watching old scout movies where scouts raced to see who could start a fire with basic methods like friction or flint/steel but as I understand that isnt allowed anymore.

 

Depends on the region and rain status.  Around here, we occasionally have burn bans in the fall (due to not enough rain), but we have enough that we have building fire without matches races at camporees.  When my troop did this (were in charge of  the competition), they had a wrinkle that the fire wasn't considered complete until a cup of water was brought to a rolling boil. 


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#40 perdidochas

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 04:37 PM

I read that either West Point or Annapolis is going to reinstate curriculum w/r to orienteering because of concerns that some day the GPS will be knocked out and that the military will once again have to navigate by map and compass.

 

That list makes it apparent why the academies like to admit Boy Scouts and especially Eagle scouts.

IIRC, it was Annapolis and they were reinstating the teaching of celestial navigation. 


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