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Twenty Skills that are Dying Out


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#1 UncleP

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 01:28 PM

I was reading an article about a new "Adulting School" (a school that teaches basic skills to adults).  The article cited a study done by the Ordnance Survey (official mapping agency of Great Britain), which listed 20 skills that people believe are dying out.  I thought this would interest people, because a least five of these skills are basic scout skills (including the first three listed). 

 

The skills are as follows (I added BOLD font to emphasize the particular skills:

  1. Reading a map
     
  2. Using a compass
     
  3. Tie a specific knot
     
  4. Darn socks
     
  5. Looking something up in a book using an index rather than “Googling it”
     
  6. Correct letter writing technique
     
  7. Understanding pounds and ounces
     
  8. Knowing your spelling and grammar
     
  9. Converting pounds and ounces to grams and kilograms
     
  10. Starting a fire from scratch
     
  11. Handwriting
     
  12. Understanding feet and inches
     
  13. Knitting
     
  14. Recall a friend or relative’s phone number from memory
     
  15. Recall a partner’s phone number from memory
     
  16. Identifying trees, insects and flowers
     
  17. Touch typing
     
  18. Baking bread from scratch
     
  19. Taking up trousers
     
  20. Wiring a plug

Below is a link to the article:

 

http://www.intellect...nger-extinction

 


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#2 qwazse

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 08:30 PM

I remember meeting several older British men who were competent in most all of these except knitting.

 

The five you identified are definitely First Class skills. Many of the others may be picked up on the trail to Eagle.


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#3 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 09:07 PM

WOW!


Edited by Eagle94-A1, 11 December 2016 - 09:07 PM.

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"Train 'em. Trust 'em. LET THEM LEAD!" William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt


#4 Stosh

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 09:29 PM

I got 18 of 20, but I don't darn socks, it's easier and cheaper just to go to Walmart.  If I have to, the new spiral light bulbs just don't do justice to a good darn.

 

The wife knits.  So I have that covered.  Got one of those Alaskan fisherman sweaters for Christmas, I'm good to go!

 

I do okay with pounds to kg's and kph vs mph, but I don't get my practice on the rest.

 

And getting accused one's whole life that they "write like a girl" isn't a big ego builder for a guy.

 

As far as grammar goes, I do know the difference between there, stuff, their "stuff" and they're "stuff"..... :)   Than of course is the Your "Stuff" and You're "Stuff".  :)


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#5 clemlaw

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 12:06 AM

Actually, I learned a couple of them that were not bolded in scouting.

 

I'm sure I would have picked it up somewhere else, but when I was a young scout, another scout (my patrol leader) for some reason gave a demonstration on how to replace an electrical plug at a troop meeting.  I think it was some requirement for a merit badge.  

 

I don't think I learned how to bake bread in scouts, but I did learn how to cook.  Actually, what I really learned is that cooking is possible, and the main thing you need to do is find the instructions and follow them.  So at some point as an adult, I decided to make bread, so I found the directions and followed them.

 

And for phone numbers, I still remember my scoutmaster's and patrol leader's phone numbers!


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#6 Cambridgeskip

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 07:04 AM

All useful, but I wonder for how long 7 and 9 will be relevant, at this side of the pond? There's a generation (including me) that has been brought up on metric for just about everything. Give it another 20 years and pounds and ounces will look as antiquated as pounds, shillings and pence!


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#7 JasonG172

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 08:53 AM

what is Darn Socks?  I know I could look it up, bit I will wait for an explanation.


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#8 Oldscout448

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 10:08 AM

" A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently,die gallantly.    Specialization is for insects!"

 

Lazarus Long


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#9 KenD500

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 10:09 AM

what is Darn Socks?  I know I could look it up, bit I will wait for an explanation.

Repair a sock with sewing


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#10 JasonG172

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 10:38 AM

Repair a sock with sewing

Oh, well that was simple enough.  Stosh is right, more cost effective buying new.


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#11 NealOnWheels

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 12:10 PM

#14 Recall a friend or relative’s phone number from memory.  How about home numbers?

 

I am shocked by the number of the scouts in my troop who do not know their home phone number.  They rely on their smart phones.


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#12 blw2

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 01:29 PM

home number?  what's that?


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#13 Stosh

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 01:47 PM

#14 Recall a friend or relative’s phone number from memory.  How about home numbers?

 

I am shocked by the number of the scouts in my troop who do not know their home phone number.  They rely on their smart phones.

 

When I was single and after my divorce, I had a difficult time trying to remember my own phone number....... I never called myself.  Duh! 


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#14 SSScout

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 09:55 PM

I know that by the time I was 7 or 8 years old, I knew my address and if I had to, could ask a taxi cab driver to take me home.  Dad told me to ALWAYS just follow New Hampshire Avenue, from ANYwhere to Norwood Rd.   My mom and I had walked the length of it in both directions so I knew where my house was.

Cooking?  I knew how to use the can opener.

Knots?   My dad had lost his left arm in a construction accident before he met my mom. He was a one armed Journey Man carpenter (thereby couldn't earn his Master's paper) and taught me how to tie my shoes one handed before I learned two handed (!)

Mapreading? Compass?   Surveying Merit Badge. Dad's friend gave me a job as a "Rod Holder "  when I was , I think, 12.

Darn socks?  When I started wearing 100% wool socks as an adult, I learned it was easy to repair those expensive socks rather than toss'em to the rag bin.


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#15 NealOnWheels

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Posted 13 December 2016 - 12:23 PM

home number?  what's that?

 

Good point!  But they should at least be able to call a parent when they don't have access to their own phone.


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#16 SpEdScouter

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 10:29 PM

Their are alot of safety concerns anymore with fires. I remember watching old scout movies where scouts raced to see who could start a fire with basic methods like friction or flint/steel but as I understand that isnt allowed anymore.


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#17 Oldscout448

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 10:49 PM

We still have district wide timed contests and if you light your fire without matches or lighter we take one minute off the patrols time.

 

Of course the true pyros complain because we banned the use of liquid oxygen ! ;)


Edited by Oldscout448, 02 January 2017 - 10:52 PM.

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#18 Stosh

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 11:06 PM

A ban on flint/steel or drill is unheard of in my area of the country.  We have boys start fires with magnesium all the time.  As a matter of fact, magnesium sticks were prizes for popcorn sales a couple of years back, still might be.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#19 qwazse

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 04:54 AM

Their are alot of safety concerns anymore with fires. I remember watching old scout movies where scouts raced to see who could start a fire with basic methods like friction or flint/steel but as I understand that isnt allowed anymore.

it's allowed. But in some places, folks have to recognize burn bans.

But this is nothing new. While those scouts in those old movies were being filmed in their flint and steel contest, somewhere in this country scouts were being asked to limit the starting of fires.
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#20 ianwilkins

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 09:44 AM

it's allowed. But in some places, folks have to recognize burn bans.

But this is nothing new. While those scouts in those old movies were being filmed in their flint and steel contest, somewhere in this country scouts were being asked to limit the starting of fires.

 

I guess, like Europe, some parts of the USA are more flammable than others. In the UK it's only really in high summer (and sometimes not even then) we need to be a bit careful with fire circles, fire buckets on standby, and not building a huge pyre. When we went to Portugal, their "campfire" was a 9" square hole in the sand, and when the flames came too far out the top, that was too big. But for them a stray spark could cause real and widespread havoc. Their wood chopping skills were limited to not much more than kindling. When they came to us the following year, we were in 400 acres of forest (nearby to Winnie the Pooh's Hundred Acre Wood as it happened), and the campsite were happy for any and all deadwood to be burnt, they threw themselves into saw and axe-work with much gusto, too much gusto at times if I'm honest. Our main fire each night was probably in a pit 4ft square. They absolutely loved it. We didn't mind either. And the night they cooked their dinner on open fires themselves...yes, bread and butter to some, but a completely new experience for them. Oh happy days.

 

Then for a while we had a lad from Australia, a very dry part of Australia. We were at the local campsite, and had a fire, of course. He was alarmed at the lack of two full big water drums to tip over the fire. When it had burnt down to embers, and we said our goodnights, he was horrified that we were going to just leave it. But it was embers, the grass was wet with dew, everything bar the fire was stereotypically British levels of damp. It would be odd for us to put it out. We might have chucked a bucket of water on it just to calm him down, but he was still a bit on edge about it. But reading up on the scale of forest fires in Aus, he was rightly trained for his normal environment. :)


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