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Got the phone call from camp....

camp homesick

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#41 Stosh

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 03:03 PM

Stosh

That certainly is a way to do things....

a very good way I might add.

but the thing is....it's not the only way.

It's not even the only good way.

 

You and I might not like it, but things, they are a changing.  Things evolve.  Sometimes aspects might get worse.  Sometimes they might get better... and others might just simply be only different... if we can let go of emotions and personal paradigms, step back and observe.

 

Naw, it's not the only way, but given the alternatives, it's still a bit better than the others.  After all is said and done, the boys still come to me when they have a question about a certain plant or animal they encounter in the woods.  Even then when we are walking the urban neighborhoods, I can still point out the difference to the boys between red and white cedars.  Not all evergreens are pine trees and not all evergreens keep their needles year around.  Sedges are not grass.  Dame's Rocket is an invasive plant, Phlox is not but they look the same.  Wild Parsley is poisonous only in the daylight.  All the parts of day lilies are edible, but tiger lilies are not.

 

Identifying 10 plants and animals is a nice little game to play while hiking.  Knowing why one is doing that is often neglected because it is not spelled out in the requirements.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#42 CalicoPenn

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Posted 02 July 2016 - 09:13 AM

Not all evergreens are pine trees and not all evergreens keep their needles year around.  Sedges are not grass.  Dame's Rocket is an invasive plant, Phlox is not but they look the same.  Wild Parsley is poisonous only in the daylight.  All the parts of day lilies are edible, but tiger lilies are not.

 

 

 

Maybe we should allow some electronics in the field - I have a pad set-up to access the internet over a mobile network - in essence, the pad is it's own wi-fi device - and as long as it can reach a cell tower, it can access the internet - then statements like the above can be checked in the field (apologies to Stosh in advance - I admit to being a precisionist when it comes to facts which means I can come across as pedantic).

 

"Not all evergreens are pine trees and not all evergreens keep their needles year around" - As written, partially true - spruce and fir are not pine trees and are evergreens, hollies are not pine trees and are evergreens.  To say that not all evergreens keep their needles year around suggests that all evergreens have needles (hollies have leaves) and semantically, if a tree loses its needles all at once every year, it's not an evergreen.   I'd say 'Not all evergreens are conifers and not all conifers are evergreens that keep their needles year around'.  Hollies aren't conifers but they are evergreens and larches are conifers but aren't evergreens.

 

"Sedges are not grass" - yep!

 

"Dame's Rocket is an invasive plant, Phlox is not but they look the same" - They do look similar from a distance but close-up, Dame's Rocket flowers have 4 petals, Phlox flowers have 5 petals - a field guide filled or web enabled pad can help make that distinction.

 

"Wild Parsley is poisonous only in the daylight" - it's Wild Parsnip that has a juice that is photo-sensitive that can cause a rash when exposed to sunlight.  In sensitive individuals, the rash usually develops a day or two after exposure so it's often unkown why the rash develops.  While the juice of the plant does need sunlight to activate, there hasn't been enough research done to determine if the juice needs to be fresh in order for it to cause a rash (thus being poisonous only in the daylight) or whether dried juices on someones arms or legs can still be activated by the sun - we don't really know if someone who is exposed to the juices at night and hasn't had a chance to wash up, wll develop a rash tooo.

 

"All the parts of day lilies are edible, but tiger lilies are not."  The plant most people think of when they hear Tiger Lily is Lilium lancifolium, aka Lilium tigrinum, a non-native orange flowered lily with spots from Asia, is in fact edible.  All parts of this plant is edible by humans but it is toxic to cats.  The original day lily, another import from Asia, an orange flowered lily without spots, Hemerocallis fulva, is also edible.  The other Day Lilies that we commonfly find growing in gardens and flower beds are either not edible or have questionable edibility.  They are generally hybrids created from Hemerocallis fulva but bred for certain characterstics like color, or size, or hardiness.  I wouldn't go out in to the garden and start harvesting your day lily floweres for your salads. 


Edited by CalicoPenn, 02 July 2016 - 09:17 AM.

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#43 Stosh

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 12:11 PM

https://web.extensio...onFactSheet.pdf


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#44 Stosh

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 12:23 PM

"Dame's Rocket is an invasive plant, Phlox is not but they look the same" - They do look similar from a distance but close-up, Dame's Rocket flowers have 4 petals, Phlox flowers have 5 petals - a field guide filled or web enabled pad can help make that distinction.

 

 

And the point I was making,.. One does not need a field guide or web enabled pad to remember 4 petals and 5 petals.  Oh, look at that pretty Phlox over there.  Nope, 4 petals means it's Dame's Rocket. 

 

Hmmmm, we're out in the woods, we see a pretty flower, we note it's color shape, and distinguishing characteristics, we draw a picture of it.  We study it's leaves, we notice the stem, we observe it's environment.  Then after we make a thorough study of it, we go home and research it.  That process takes time and that will cause a memory imprint whereas a quick look up on the ipad will produce a result in 15 seconds that will take another 15 seconds and it will be long gone from one's memory.

 

One mistake with edible Wild Cow Parsley and there's nothing more to worry about.

 

Stinging Nettle is a skin irritant that is highly nutritious.  Dead Nettle just looks pretty in the garden and forests.  Jewel Weed grows alongside of Stinging Nettle in many places and this is useful to know.


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#45 blw2

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 01:57 PM

The printed book meets opposition from adults for its use? Maybe in 1356 but not in the 20th or 21st century.

 

 

exactly!

at some point in time, we came around........

and we at this stage of the game (2016) still need to remind ourselves that change isn't necessarily bad..... and even if it is, it is what it is....


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#46 Stosh

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 02:46 PM

By the way.....

 

Wild Parsnip is listed in some books as of the PARSLEY family....  Other books put it in the CARROT family.  The common name is not a valid way of identifying plants.  Wild Parsnip in Alaska is called Pushky.

 

Identifying 10 plants for the sake of advancement to FC shouldn't be that hard.  Just remember there's stuff out there that unless one has done extensive research on is potentially harmful if not flat out deadly.  Don't rely on just one book or one website either. 


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#47 Zaphod

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 05:11 PM

He's home and still alive! He had a good time and had lots of stories to tell. Some things he thought he'd hate (horseback riding) he loved. When asked if he wanted to do it again next year he said, "ummmm probably." lol   That's pretty good from him. 

 

Oh and he is doing his best to catch up with his missed electronics time today! Especially since their bus was 5 hours late picking them up yesterday and then had to make an extra stop putting him home at 9pm instead of 1pm. I'll give him today.... 


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#48 Chadamus

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 05:38 PM

Glad to hear he had a good time Zaphod! ☺
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#49 Back Pack

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Posted 05 July 2016 - 07:32 AM

exactly!
at some point in time, we came around........
and we at this stage of the game (2016) still need to remind ourselves that change isn't necessarily bad..... and even if it is, it is what it is....


When it becomes an addiction then that's an issue.

How much screen time is too much? These kids get likely 4 hours or more a day? You'd think a week without it will kill them. Have yet to see a kid die from not using his Kindle to go to sleep.
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#50 Melgamatic

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 12:58 PM

What are the other boys going to do when their batteries go dead?

 

A Kindle battery will last several weeks.  The e-ink only uses battery when changing the contents of the page (not during normal display), so they last a long time.

 

Both my son and I will be bringing our Kindles on trek at Philmont next year.  They are lighter than the paperback book he had, and I didn't bring a book because I didn't want the weight and volume.  It was a mistake.  Reading for 10 minutes before falling asleep or when the scouts were doing program would have been relaxing.

 

I'm anti-phone on trek (mine was turned off in my pack for the 10 days on trail), but pro-Kindle.


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