Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Closed Toe Shoes


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 Petey091

Petey091

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 21 posts

Posted 13 June 2016 - 07:13 AM

 I need some help. I know that many troops prohibit open toe shoes for troop activity and I can understand why. I have been told that this is a national BSA Policy but I can not find any mention of it in the guide to safe scouting. Am I just missing it or is it listed in some other location?  I agree its a good idea but I don't want to look like a fool and site it as BSA Policy and it not be.


  • 0

#2 Tampa Turtle

Tampa Turtle

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2458 posts

Posted 13 June 2016 - 09:03 AM

IMHO the rule of common sense should prevail; we do not all need to be policy lawyers. I have been at camp outs wear boys went barefoot and cut their feet and had to be stitched up...much extra work for leaders. I was on a backpacking trip when a scouter wore open toed sandals...got up in broad daylight and impaled a stick in the webbing next to his big toe. Couldn't get a boot on anymore, had to hobble down a side trail so we could arrange a car pickup half a day later. 


  • 1

#3 RichardB

RichardB

    Member

  • Members
  • 222 posts

Posted 13 June 2016 - 09:09 AM

 Am unable to provide a citation where something is that does not exist is located.   Good idea reference is here:  

 

http://www.scouting....Safety/GSS.aspx

 

In situations not specifically covered in this guide, activity planners should evaluate the risk or potential risk of harm, and respond with action plans based on common sense, community standards, the Boy Scout motto, and safety policies and practices commonly prescribed for the activity by experienced providers and practitioners.


  • 1

#4 MrBob

MrBob

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 191 posts

Posted 13 June 2016 - 11:10 AM

 I need some help. I know that many troops prohibit open toe shoes for troop activity and I can understand why. I have been told that this is a national BSA Policy but I can not find any mention of it in the guide to safe scouting. Am I just missing it or is it listed in some other location?  I agree its a good idea but I don't want to look like a fool and site it as BSA Policy and it not be.

 

If you make it a "Unit Policy", then whether or not its a BSA Policy is irrelevant.


  • 0

#5 scoutldr

scoutldr

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 4431 posts

Posted 13 June 2016 - 12:25 PM

I agree..."dress appropriately for the occasion" should be common sense.  It is a policy at most summer camps.  Sandals and flip-flops allowed only IN the showers...to and from must be closed shoes.


  • 0

#6 perdidochas

perdidochas

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2158 posts

Posted 13 June 2016 - 12:38 PM

 I need some help. I know that many troops prohibit open toe shoes for troop activity and I can understand why. I have been told that this is a national BSA Policy but I can not find any mention of it in the guide to safe scouting. Am I just missing it or is it listed in some other location?  I agree its a good idea but I don't want to look like a fool and site it as BSA Policy and it not be.

 

I've got mixed feelings about it. On one hand, I'm a fan of sports-type sandals (such as Tevas), and have never had any problems in the outdoors with them.  On the other hand, I'm dealing with other people's kids, and any way that I can avoid taking them to the emergency room is good.  I like the closed-toe sandals as a compromise that's "scout legal." 


  • 0

#7 Petey091

Petey091

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 21 posts

Posted 14 June 2016 - 01:53 PM

Thanks for the replies. I have no problem with it being a troop policy. The problem was I was told it was BSA policy and I could not find were that was stated. I just didn't want to be the guy who states that it was BSA policy and it is not.  We had a big influx of new scouts and another scouter was telling them it was BSA policy that they needed to wear closed toe shoes.


  • 0

#8 jr56

jr56

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 900 posts

Posted 14 June 2016 - 01:56 PM

Common sense would prevail.    With the risk of ruining a trip, why would anybody in their right mind want to go running around in the outdoors without their feet protected?   Duh


  • 0

#9 Stosh

Stosh

    BSA Heretic

  • Members
  • 11748 posts

Posted 14 June 2016 - 02:06 PM

After 61 years of camping I have seen my fair share of arch cuts from tent stakes, burns from stepping on a hot coal and toe-nails ripped off, along with a broken toe here or there.  All them were preventable.


  • 0

Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#10 SWScouter

SWScouter

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 711 posts

Posted 14 June 2016 - 03:53 PM

A lot of "National BSA Policy" really is just your local camp policy, or just somebody repeating what they were told from somebody else who was repeating what they were told from somebody else who was repeating what they were told from somebody else, ad infinitum. There are a lot of policies that really are nothing more than myth.


  • 0

#11 Beavah

Beavah

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 8158 posts

Posted 14 June 2016 - 09:15 PM

Nah, not national BSA policy @Petey091.

 

It is the policy at some BSA summer camps, as a local rule.

 

B


  • 0

#12 CubScoutIdeas

CubScoutIdeas

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 11 posts

Posted 15 June 2016 - 08:28 PM

I've been involved with our Cub Scout day camp as an instructor or director since 2009.  Our camp's policy has always been closed toed shoes--even when the fire department comes to hose down the  boys.

 

This one is just plain  ole good common sense!  :)


  • 0

#13 Tatung42

Tatung42

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 24 posts

Posted 16 June 2016 - 02:12 PM

Like others have said, there is no BSA policy against open toed shoes.  For example, flip-flops are considered OK at Seabase for your land shoes.  However, many camps and units have their own local rules.


  • 0

#14 Tampa Turtle

Tampa Turtle

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2458 posts

Posted 17 June 2016 - 10:52 AM

Oh RichardB where are you when we need you!


  • 0

#15 RichardB

RichardB

    Member

  • Members
  • 222 posts

Posted 18 June 2016 - 05:48 PM

Oh RichardB where are you when we need you!

 What is the expectation?   Can't provide something that does not exist.   See the above post.   


  • 2

#16 King Ding Dong

King Ding Dong

    Snack Master

  • Members
  • 1378 posts

Posted 18 June 2016 - 07:46 PM

This one is just like the "National Policy becuase of Insurance" that you must wear the Field Uniform while traveling. It is a great idea and may be a troop policy but not National. Whenever I hear that one I love to watch them squirm when I ask them how can that possibly be a National Policy when National is very explicit that a Uniform is NOT required to be a Scout. Priceless.
  • 0

#17 Hedgehog

Hedgehog

    Erinaceomorpha Erinaceidae Member

  • Members
  • 673 posts

Posted 20 June 2016 - 06:33 AM

Common sense would prevail.    With the risk of ruining a trip, why would anybody in their right mind want to go running around in the outdoors without their feet protected?   Duh

 

 

1.  Hiking sandals (such as Tevas) provide excellent ventilation keeping feet from sweating and forming blisters.

2.  Hiking sandals are very useful on long treks to change the contact points if you have blisters.

3.  Flip flops and other sandals are very comfortable to walk around camp with and better than barefoot or in socks (seen both)

4.  Flip flops and Crocks are great if you are going to get wet due to swimming, bathing or being hosed down.  Also, having a boy stick a foot that is wet from the lake and dirty from the mud / grass they just walked into in a sock is asking for feet that smell toxic.


  • 1

#18 krikkitbot

krikkitbot

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 112 posts

Posted 23 June 2016 - 03:54 PM

I've been wearing sandals most of the time (weather permitting) for 28 years. Yes, I was one of the first to get Tevas when you could only get them in small, medium, and large. Sport sandals have come a long way since then. I wear them hiking, canoeing, rafting, and have even worn them rock climbing. 

 

I even worked at a picture frame shop and wore sandals every day. I still have all my fingers and toes even though there was broken glass and razor blades.


  • 0

#19 Stosh

Stosh

    BSA Heretic

  • Members
  • 11748 posts

Posted 24 June 2016 - 08:37 PM

I learned how to deal with closed toe shoes and blisters.  If done correctly one can maximize safety and don't need sandals.

 

9 days in Philmont, no blisters.  One boy who mirrored what I was doing did not get blisters either.  Everyone else did, some were pulling off bloody socks at the end of the day.

 

Trading cuts for blisters doesn't need to be an either/or choice.


  • 0

Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#20 SWScouter

SWScouter

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 711 posts

Posted 26 June 2016 - 10:07 PM

I've been using these Umara Z-Trail sandals. they're great. I run in them and hike in really rocky terrain with them. A bit pricey, but very nice.


Edited by SWScouter, 26 June 2016 - 10:07 PM.

  • 0




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


IPB Skin By Virteq