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Best tent for Scoutmaster


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#1 joesport5

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 06:35 AM

I have always tried to avoid tents and instead am used to sleeping on the ground or recently in hammocks. But my back is getting worse and summer camp is fast approaching so I am thinking of purchasing a tent.....so my question is what are some of the good tents out there (looking to stay under $200 if possible)

 

Mainly lookly for rainproof, durability, able to stand up in and put a cot.

 


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#2 blw2

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 07:01 AM

well, I guess at that price point this one is out....

3d_rv_cut_multi.jpg


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#3 blw2

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 07:08 AM

A lot of folks seem to go for hammocks.  I keep wanting to try it, but don't want to plop down the cash just in case it's not for me....

 

 

Sorry, can't really help with 1st hand experience.... I went the other direction for my last tent purchase.... trying to keep size and weight down a bit for eventual packing.  i bought the outdated model of this one

https://www.rei.com/...alf-dome-2-tent

 

A couple of our ASMs went with one of these....not sure if they went with the 4, 6, or 8 model though.

https://www.rei.com/...-kingdom-4-tent

and one of them has the optional garage which makes a great front porch

 

but they just make me chuckle because they are so big for one guy to sleep in....


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#4 Krampus

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 07:15 AM

Sorry, I use this one. Only just over 2lbs. I save weight on the tent and add it to the better air mattress. ;)

 

At summer camp the places we go, unless high adventure, provide the tents, mattress and cots for us. Only a few don't supply the cots/mattress.


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#5 qwazse

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 07:42 AM

Our camp provides decent wall "A-frame" tents, which we supplement with tarps and, as needed, our preferred cot. (Camp cots have something to be desired if your back is aching.)

 

I still usually set up a rope hammock for those afternoon power naps. :)


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#6 Lurking...

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 08:02 AM

@qwazse  :)  There is no such thing as a wall "A-frame" tent.  It's one or the other.  I do have a real A-frame tent that I use for summer camp long-term camping when the camp doesn't provide a wall tent.  It's the only tent I own that I can stand up in.  I have an old Kelty 3 man tent that I use most often, but for short term camping in cold weather the old 2 man army surplus pup tent gets dragged out.  I have a very short cot that fits in there nicely and with double vestibules on each end, it has plenty of room for a single person.  My Mrs. has a nice modern/nylon 4 man tent with double vestibules we use when she camps with the troop.  For kayaking I have a one-man tent that isn't much bigger than my sleeping bag.  You can stand up in it, but all the stakes come out of the ground when you do.


Edited by Stosh, 24 May 2016 - 08:04 AM.

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#7 King Ding Dong

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 08:45 AM

Cots are really hard on tent floors. Even the type with lateral crossbars on the ground and going to tug and pull on the floor especially with wet or soft ground. I have the Texsport King cot I use for summer camp and a REI 3.5" XL pad, but only outside or in wall tents. Unless it is long term camp the hassle lugging of around and setting up a cot is just not worth it to me.

As far as a stand up tent the Eureka Tetragon line is decent and I bought a 8 man (4 man, always divide by half) 6 years ago for $200. It has held up pretty well and the floor has not leaked once despite surviving several soaking camporees. One of my poles splintered recently when a Scout was a little to aggressive with helping me set it up, but you can get replacement pole sections.
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#8 Krampus

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 09:11 AM

I'm laughing right now because we hear so much disdain for "plop" camping, and yet so many folks have these Taj Mahal tents with cots, mattresses, refrigerators and Jacuzzis. ;)


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#9 King Ding Dong

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 09:50 AM

I'm laughing right now because we hear so much disdain for "plop" camping, and yet so many folks have these Taj Mahal tents with cots, mattresses, refrigerators and Jacuzzis. ;)

Well there is such things as Cub and Family Camping as well you know.

Send me a link to the one with the Jacuzzi, I want one of those.

If one does get one of the big complex tents with separate rooms and all make sure you set it up at home first and not stop at Wal Mart on the way to the campground. The new ASM at my old troop bought this overly complex Kelty with a half dozen different pole sizes. After watching him struggle with it in the dark for a good half hour I finally grabbed the directions out of the box and helped him out. :)
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#10 Lurking...

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 10:10 AM

I have used a no-floor, open-ended pup tent for years.  It has even replaced my backpack on overnight treks.  But, alas, not many people really want that much roughing it in nature where everything is roughing it.  A nylon poncho makes a great tent too.  Sleeping under an overturned canoe makes for a nice camper, can't call it a tent unless one augments it with the no-floor, open-ended pup tent.  :)


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#11 Lurking...

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 10:13 AM

I'm laughing right now because we hear so much disdain for "plop" camping, and yet so many folks have these Taj Mahal tents with cots, mattresses, refrigerators and Jacuzzis. ;)

 

propane refrigerators have a pilot light.... no flames in tent.  :)


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#12 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 10:42 AM

I have always tried to avoid tents and instead am used to sleeping on the ground or recently in hammocks. But my back is getting worse and summer camp is fast approaching so I am thinking of purchasing a tent.....so my question is what are some of the good tents out there (looking to stay under $200 if possible)

 

Mainly lookly for rainproof, durability, able to stand up in and put a cot.

If you insist upon a cot then you need to work the dimensions of your tent around that. Most 2 man tents are out. Cots are hard on floor so you would probably want some tarp on the floor to protect it.

 

Personally I found the Hammock best for my back.

 

Yeah most summer camps have wall tents or Adirondacks (open huts), I'd check 1st. Though after my experience in one last weekend next time I am packing a Mosquito net.


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#13 perdidochas

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 11:05 AM

I have always tried to avoid tents and instead am used to sleeping on the ground or recently in hammocks. But my back is getting worse and summer camp is fast approaching so I am thinking of purchasing a tent.....so my question is what are some of the good tents out there (looking to stay under $200 if possible)

 

Mainly lookly for rainproof, durability, able to stand up in and put a cot.

To me, a hammock is the best for my back. The last time I went to summer camp, I slept in my hammock, but had my gear in a tent.  Don't most summer camps provide tents?


Edited by perdidochas, 24 May 2016 - 11:07 AM.

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#14 blw2

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 11:17 AM

Sorry, I use this one. Only just over 2lbs. I save weight on the tent and add it to the better air mattress. ;)

 

At summer camp the places we go, unless high adventure, provide the tents, mattress and cots for us. Only a few don't supply the cots/mattress.

I'd probably have gone a bit smaller like that one, or REI-s version of it....

but at the time i was looking for something that I could also use with DS when he was still in cubs, but knowing that he was soon moving out.  the little bit of extra room is nice for my stuff.... and an acceptable compromise considering I don't do as much backpacking as I'd like.

Mine is still small enough that it's still packable.... but 2# sure sounds nice in the pack!

 

If it weren't for all the biting bugs and crawlys in this warm climate I live in, I'd consider more open camping sometimes, as Stosh describes

 

oh, and here are some better more Scout worthy options to compare to that 1st one I suggested..... just stumbled across this headline at lunch, and thought i'd share

https://gearjunkie.c...s-overland-expo


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#15 Krampus

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 11:31 AM

 

oh, and here are some better more Scout worthy options to compare to that 1st one I suggested..... just stumbled across this headline at lunch, and thought i'd share

https://gearjunkie.c...s-overland-expo

 

That's too close to the English past time of "caravaning" for me. ;)


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#16 Lurking...

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 11:56 AM

Those units appear to be a bit wide for most hiking trails.... :(


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#17 Lurking...

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 11:59 AM

If it weren't for all the biting bugs and crawlys in this warm climate I live in, I'd consider more open camping sometimes, as Stosh describes

 

 

I take it you have never visited WI/MN in the summer time?  We gotcha beat on biting bugs and crawlys.  The mosquitoes up here are as bad as the tropics, have to wear bandana over mouth and nose at dawn/dusk to keep from breathing them in.

 

A poncho and mosquito netting is all one needs.  With a walking stick and stake, one doesn't even need the two trees to hang a hammock


Edited by Stosh, 24 May 2016 - 12:00 PM.

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#18 King Ding Dong

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 12:37 PM

Those units appear to be a bit wide for most hiking trails.... :(


I think they can cut their own trail.
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#19 Lurking...

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 01:52 PM

Yeah, but where does one go that they need to spend that kind of money to get there? and why drag "home" along with you in the process?


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#20 blw2

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 01:59 PM

Those units appear to be a bit wide for most hiking trails.... :(

 

 

If it weren't for all the biting bugs and crawlys in this warm climate I live in, I'd consider more open camping sometimes, as Stosh describes

 

 

I take it you have never visited WI/MN in the summer time?  We gotcha beat on biting bugs and crawlys.  The mosquitoes up here are as bad as the tropics, have to wear bandana over mouth and nose at dawn/dusk to keep from breathing them in.

 

A poncho and mosquito netting is all one needs.  With a walking stick and stake, one doesn't even need the two trees to hang a hammock

 

I have been there.... but by bed time it cools down, the sweatshirts come out, the mosquitoes go wherever it is that they go, the camp fires get lit, ahhh..... good sleeping weather.

Down here, I think it gets hotter and muggier at bedtime in the summer....

 

(yeah, I know that this isn't always the case.  I've sweated through nights up there too.... it's just those nice cool summer evenings are my more favored memories)

I think they can cut their own trail.

you beat me to it KDD!


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