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New Tent wanted


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#21 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 12:38 PM

Nearly every state in the US has a Surplus Property Program.  Scout troops can get military surplus tents, sleeping bags, and all types of gear for next to nothing.  Stuff like this for $20 or so:

 

http://www.ebay.com/...O0AAOSw5dNWks91

 

http://www.ebay.com/...qkAAOxy0x1TRFYn

 

 

My troop growing up had a saying, I want to attribute to a  dad who was colonel in the army but can't remember:  " Military surplus. If it's designed to survive combat, it may survive Boy Scouts."


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#22 TAHAWK

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 12:49 PM

In the U.S. and the UK, a tent to be called "waterproof" has to have 1000mm water resistance (1000 mm hydrostatic head).  Trouble is, some tents are sold as "waterproof" which have only that - 1000mm.   Very little wear of the coating is needed before water starts coming through.  The tent I just bought is rated over 3000mm.   A factor to consider in selecting.

 

The Terra Nova Trisar is rated at 4000mm for the fly and 6000 for the floor.  MSRP is 190 GBP.  Rated as 2-man/3-4 season/3.7 KG.


Edited by TAHAWK, 17 January 2016 - 12:50 PM.

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#23 qwazse

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 01:15 PM

This may sound trivial, but at times I've found to be an annoyance.
How many of you like he tent in general, but have found yourself getting replacement stakes (or possibly some other part that came with the tent) an your earliest opportunity?

For he Eurekas, the aluminum stakes were a disappointment.
For the Colemans, invariably I'd be replacing the poles or cutting down dining fly poles to use as wind supports.

Edited by qwazse, 17 January 2016 - 01:18 PM.

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#24 Stosh

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 02:54 PM

Both my Kelty tents have rain flies that go all the way to the ground all the way around and have vestibules.  Wind does not get under them as much and the rain doesn't pound on the tent directly.  Two weather issues important to me.

 

Old floor-less canvas tents - get a cot, let the water run through and you'll stay dry very nicely.  I have a low clot that goes well in a 2 man military (WWII) surplus tent.  I've had water run through pretty heavily at times, but always stayed dry.  Same for my Civil War A-Frame tent with full sized cot inside.


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#25 TAHAWK

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 05:31 PM

This may sound trivial, but at times I've found to be an annoyance.
How many of you like he tent in general, but have found yourself getting replacement stakes (or possibly some other part that came with the tent) an your earliest opportunity?

For he Eurekas, the aluminum stakes were a disappointment.
For the Colemans, invariably I'd be replacing the poles or cutting down dining fly poles to use as wind supports.

 

Me.  But after so many years, the "replacements" are at hand: one set for three seasons and another for snow.


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#26 Stosh

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 10:02 PM

I don't use stakes (or poles) in the winter.  I take the tent and just wrap it around me.  :)


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Stosh

 

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#27 Cambridgeskip

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Posted 18 January 2016 - 07:15 AM

Skip - maybe this is a radical idea but given how much you liked your Vango tent, a brand not really seen much over on this side of the pond, have you considered giving Vango a call and asking them what their new equivalent to the Hydra is?   Seems to me that if they've discontinued the Hydra, there is a good chance they did so because they have a replacement out there for it that was just different enough that they decided to rename it - I know that North Face and Kelty will often make improvements on their tents that may not be really obvious to us but that they think is significant enough to require a name change.

 Been there and done that!

 

Slight problem.... most of the more robust two man tents both from Vango and others are now designed to have 2 separate entrances, one each side, for the two occupants. I'm more after one that has the traditional front door with a single porch section. They do one called the Sirroco that is more what I'm after but before I shell out £180 I'd like to see what others think!


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#28 Ankylus

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 12:33 PM

Too bad you can't get REI in the UK. They have some great, lightweight tents.

 

Big Agnes, Marmot and Kelty are constantly at the top of gear reviews. Backpacking review here, Gearlab here.

 

 

I am leery of REI tents these days. I bought a 1 one half-dome tent for Philmont and the first day on the trail one of the poles broke as I was setting it up. They give you that little sleeve for temporary repairs, and that got me through the rest of the two weeks.

 

Overall, I liked the tent, though. So when I got back I went to REI and asked for a replacement pole. They told me they don't have separate poles, so they gave me a new tent. That was the good part.

 

But after 4 years, the waterproofing started to come off the fly. I mean, just absolutely peel off in large chunks. So I went back and they told me they wouldn't replace it because that's just wear and as you can only expect 4 to 5 years out of a fly like that.

 

Meanwhile the tent I bought for $50 at Academy 15 years ago is still going strong. It's just not a backpacking tent.


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#29 krikkitbot

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 04:01 PM

I really like my Eureka Amari pass 2. It has held up in all kinds of weather (when properly staked). My son borrowed it for a backpacking trip and thought it was a 3 person tent because it was so roomy. It is lightweight too, I've been considering going the hammock way but once you add tarp, straps, and hammock, you are at about the same weight as my tent. 


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#30 Hedgehog

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 04:40 PM

So far, my REI Quarterdome had held up great (except for one spot where it looks like embers from the fire hit the side of the tent - but that is covered in repair tape and is good as new).  

 

I also love my Big Agnes Fly Creek 2 for backpacking.  You can't go wrong with a 2 pound tent.  It has held up well for two years with the exceptions of some small pinholes in the fly (which let through a total of five drops of water during a torrential rain storm) and a rip in the stuff sack (which also is covered with tape).

 

My ENO hammock with Atlas straps and a rainfly weighs about as much as my two person Big Agnes Fly Creek.  However, it makes up for it in comfort and ease to set-up.

 

My Bearpaw Wilderness tarp with flaps is great and lightweight (about a pound) but I haven't used it for sleeping yet (just for gear or a dining fly).

 

I haven't tried out my Eureka Alpine four seasons tent yet because I haven't been winter camping (it was 60 degrees on our December campout, we slept in Adorondak shelters in January and cabins in February).  I tried to convince my son to try it out in the backyard the night we were supposed to get two feet of snow but for some reason he didn't think that sounded like fun.


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#31 Stosh

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 05:18 PM

Smart boy, snow caves are warmer than tents.  A 4 season tent means it can take the harsh weather of winter.  It offers no creature comforts.  There are a few features of the 4 season to reduce the moisture buildup inside the tent due to warm breath and may add a few degrees of heat retention, but I still prefer the snow caves or meadow crashing in the winter.  Be careful with the 2' of snow forecast when you meadow crash.  :) 


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Stosh

 

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#32 Hedgehog

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 06:19 AM

Smart boy, snow caves are warmer than tents.  A 4 season tent means it can take the harsh weather of winter.  It offers no creature comforts.  There are a few features of the 4 season to reduce the moisture buildup inside the tent due to warm breath and may add a few degrees of heat retention, but I still prefer the snow caves or meadow crashing in the winter.  Be careful with the 2' of snow forecast when you meadow crash.  :)

 

 

I'd be fine with a snow cave or quinzie, but he choose his warm bed in the heated house.  As far as I can tell from my research, the main difference in the 4 season tent is that the poles and design are stronger to support the weight of heavy snow on the tent.  

 

I forgot to add the lightweight $14  that my son and I used to sleep on for our Order of the Arrow Ordeal (https://www.amazon.c...duct/B01DUKKVR8) - nothing  like sleeping under the stars.


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#33 blw2

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 06:37 AM

meadow crashing?


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#34 Stosh

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 07:26 AM

I'd be fine with a snow cave or quinzie, but he choose his warm bed in the heated house.  As far as I can tell from my research, the main difference in the 4 season tent is that the poles and design are stronger to support the weight of heavy snow on the tent.  

 

I forgot to add the lightweight $14  that my son and I used to sleep on for our Order of the Arrow Ordeal (https://www.amazon.c...duct/B01DUKKVR8) - nothing  like sleeping under the stars.

 

 

Yep, forgot that, the poles are able to hold the weight of the snow, but the big difference is the liner that collects the frost on the inside of the tent rather than on the walls themselves.  I think the walls of the tent are of a heavier mil nylon, too.  It's just made to hold up under the brutal wind, cold and snow offered up by the northern climates.

 

meadow crashing?

 

Sleeping out under the stars.  No tent, no snow cave, no shelter of any sort.  It's nice in the winter time.  One doesn't need to worry about bug netting.  :)


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Stosh

 

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