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Non-American & International campfire food?


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#21 Stosh

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 10:24 AM

Experience will tell you to adjust the briquettes with temperature, wind, etc.  You are totally correct in that the ground, damp or not, will draw heat away from the DO so a double layer of foil will protect the grass and keep the heat from going down into the ground.  an old steel cookie sheet works well, too.

 

I ALWAYS use a spacer when baking.  I use 9" pie pans to hold the food in.  A 9" pie pan will hold 1/2 a 9"X13" recipe.  Two DO's will cover a 9"X13" hotdish nicely.  By using the 9" pie pans, nothing ever burns and clean up is a breeze as well.  I have both cast iron and aluminum spacers made for DO"s, but as I mentioned earlier, 3 small rocks work just as well.

 

Thanks for the reminder.  I have been using a DO table for a few years when I plop camp so, I forgot to mention the ground issue, and yes, it is noticeable the amount of heat lost to the ground.


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#22 ianwilkins

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 02:09 AM

While we're on an international tip, the south africans have a thing called a potjie (pron. pot-chee), basically looks like a more witches cauldron type of dutch oven, with longer legs. Of course, much of south africa was invaded by the dutch as well as the english*, so it ties up they'd have something very similar, same source. I assume the english at the time thought lids were for weirdos.

 

* gross simplification, no offence meant.


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#23 qwazse

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 07:59 AM

...

Pizzelle? I looked that up. Is that a kind of waffle?

Oh, you poor soul. You must have never been to a western PA wedding (or wakes).

Get yourself invited to (or crash) a couple of those, gravitate toward the cookie table. There's bound to be at least one Nona, Sitta, or Babcia who will have contributed a few to the medley.

 

Best description: ice-cream cone unrolled.


Edited by qwazse, 20 October 2015 - 08:01 AM.

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#24 walk in the woods

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 02:22 PM

Sounds like what I know as lukken.  


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#25 Stosh

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 02:29 PM

Or if one is Norse - krumkakke


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#26 qwazse

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 03:24 PM

... Pizzelle? I looked that up. Is that a kind of waffle?

Sounds like what I know as lukken.  

Or if one is Norse - krumkakke

 

I believe so.

 

For reference, below is Mamma's recipe. My siblings just unearthed it ... written in the back cover of the Searchlight Cook Book, labeled "Waffles": The proportions are hers.They differ from other Mediterranean recipies in that there is a lower proportion of sugar -- yielding a product that is more chewy than crunchy. The instructions are mine (from warm memories of working the stove in the basement with Dad while listening to the ball game on the radio).

 
1 C shortening
2 C sugar
10 eggs
2 t salt
10 t baking powder
5 T vanilla
2 T anise (optional)
10 C flour
 
Combine ingredients in the order listed. Beat dough until smooth.  Chill until ready to use.
On a stove stop or propane burner. (Confession: I've been too chicken to try this on wood fires.) Heat a well-seasoned iron until water drops vaporize in about 2 seconds. (Don't know if that changes with altitude.)
Scoop 1-2 teaspons of dough into a ball. Insert into iron. Squeeze about 10 seconds. Release for another 10 seconds. (The dough should hold the iron sufficiently tight.) Flip iron and heat from the other side. Heat for another 20 seconds. Open iron and drop cookie onto a cooling tray. They are stack-able after about a minute. Adjust the timing to your preferred level of brownness.
 
Or, if you didn't season your iron properly, use a fork to pick out the bits of cookie in all of the grooves! Wipe the iron down with your favorite veggie oil, and sacrifice a few dough balls to lift the grit from the grooves. (Actually, I learned to like those gnarly cookies -- they weren't sequestered to the cookie jars.) :)
 
I think this gets you about 4-6 dozen. Since there's nobody to listen to a ball game with anymore, I usually just make a half batch, and can knock it out in about an hour.

Edited by qwazse, 20 October 2015 - 03:26 PM.

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#27 blw2

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 01:07 PM

Ok - what's haloumie? (yeah, I could google it, but I'm guessing I'm not the only one wondering).

 

Bread on the bottom of the tinfoil packet to help keep the meat from burning.....ever have one of those moments where you see or read of something that should have been obvious for years?  Perhaps you heard my hand slapping my forehaed just now!

+1 on the bread tip!

 

Well for a Dutch oven you often need as much heat on the top as you do on the bottom so thats why you put some coals on top.

I haven't done all that much DO cooking, but I have settled on the ring method instead of counting briquettes.

as in one ring under and 1-1/2 rings over for approx 350 degrees F (where a ring is a full circle with coals touching, and a half ring skips every other coal in the ring)

has worked well for me so far and no counting, don't care how big the oven is, etc....


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#28 walk in the woods

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 02:23 PM

 

I believe so.

 

For reference, below is Mamma's recipe. My siblings just unearthed it ... written in the back cover of the Searchlight Cook Book, labeled "Waffles": The proportions are hers.They differ from other Mediterranean recipies in that there is a lower proportion of sugar -- yielding a product that is more chewy than crunchy. The instructions are mine (from warm memories of working the stove in the basement with Dad while listening to the ball game on the radio).

 
1 C shortening
2 C sugar
10 eggs
2 t salt
10 t baking powder
5 T vanilla
2 T anise (optional)
10 C flour
 
Combine ingredients in the order listed. Beat dough until smooth.  Chill until ready to use.
On a stove stop or propane burner. (Confession: I've been too chicken to try this on wood fires.) Heat a well-seasoned iron until water drops vaporize in about 2 seconds. (Don't know if that changes with altitude.)
Scoop 1-2 teaspons of dough into a ball. Insert into iron. Squeeze about 10 seconds. Release for another 10 seconds. (The dough should hold the iron sufficiently tight.) Flip iron and heat from the other side. Heat for another 20 seconds. Open iron and drop cookie onto a cooling tray. They are stack-able after about a minute. Adjust the timing to your preferred level of brownness.
 
Or, if you didn't season your iron properly, use a fork to pick out the bits of cookie in all of the grooves! Wipe the iron down with your favorite veggie oil, and sacrifice a few dough balls to lift the grit from the grooves. (Actually, I learned to like those gnarly cookies -- they weren't sequestered to the cookie jars.) :)
 
I think this gets you about 4-6 dozen. Since there's nobody to listen to a ball game with anymore, I usually just make a half batch, and can knock it out in about an hour.

 

Thanks alot. Now I'm hungry! :)  Think we'll have to dig out the iron and see what we can do for Xmas gifts.


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#29 walk in the woods

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 02:25 PM

+1 on the bread tip!

 

I haven't done all that much DO cooking, but I have settled on the ring method instead of counting briquettes.

as in one ring under and 1-1/2 rings over for approx 350 degrees F (where a ring is a full circle with coals touching, and a half ring skips every other coal in the ring)

has worked well for me so far and no counting, don't care how big the oven is, etc....

I also use the ring method.  I try to keep the bottom ring just outside a circle drawn through the legs but inside the walls on the camp stove.  No hot spots on the bottom of the oven.  I normally just checkerboard-ish the top.


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