Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Alternative to Fundraising.


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 02 September 2015 - 06:41 PM

I bet this could be adapted for the different units to send to the parents.  

 

11780646_10207433461340743_497460071_n.j


  • 1

#2 ianwilkins

ianwilkins

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 224 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 05:15 AM

True story. I know a leader who, fed up with lack of support for any fundraising, turned round and said to the parents, you have a choice, join in, or we put the fees up by £30 ($45 ish) a year, or maybe more, and scrap fundraising. They unanimously voted to be chequebook parents. In a way, the leader was deeply saddened at the parents missing the point somewhat, then he thought about all the spare time he'd just made to go do his own hobbies...


  • 0

#3 desertrat77

desertrat77

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2252 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 05:48 AM

For many years, I've been more than happy to write a check to avoid peddling stale/overpriced candy/popcorn/cookies, smelly candles and other junk that no one really wants.

 

If they need help setting up the school carnival, hauling gear for the troop, or serving as a timer at the swim meet, sure, no problem.   Selling stuff?   No.  I will not impose on family, coworkers and neighbors to buy rubbish to support my kid.


Edited by desertrat77, 03 September 2015 - 05:54 AM.

  • 1

#4 jr56

jr56

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 900 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 10:52 AM

True, I have always felt uncomfortable about selling overpriced goods to raise money.  Almost like saying, here, buy this $2 box of popcorn, and throw in a $13 donation.


  • 0

#5 SSScout

SSScout

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 4033 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 11:16 AM

An organization around here holds a "virtual"  Mother's Day Tea ".  Around May 1st, they send out a letter with a tea bag attached, asking folks to make a cup of tea, consider all the things Mom did for them ("M is for the many things ...)  , and send in a donation in honor of their mother.


  • 1

#6 Eagledad

Eagledad

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 5996 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 11:59 AM

True, I have always felt uncomfortable about selling overpriced goods to raise money.  Almost like saying, here, buy this $2 box of popcorn, and throw in a $13 donation.

But they don't mind. Instead of feeling guilty, consider instead that you are providing them a wonderful opportunity to show their support and respect. Now that all my kids are married, I like to give. I like to see the smiles on the scouts' faces. It's fun.

 

Last year my wife came home to $70 worth of cookies and knew what had just happened. A cute little thing too shy to really say anything knocked on my door on one very cooled day. While she was trying to sputter a few words, I look up at mom who was standing (freezing) in the street with a red wagon full of cookies. I told the little girl to give me five boxes of everything. I don't know who was happier, mom or her daughter. I once bought $40 worth of popcorn from a scout and told him to keep it to make another $40. I WANT TO GIVE, I just need an excuse and someone to knock on my door!

 

Now, does fund raising build character? When we first started our troop, we had no equipment, so the first couple years of scouts spent a lot of time fun raising. Without going into the details, the PLC a few years later wanted the troop to do more fundraisers because it had become obvious that scouts who did't earn the funds for the equipment they were using didn't have the same respect for the care of it. Sometimes fundraising isn't about the money.

 

I love this scouting stuff.

 

Barry


Edited by Eagledad, 03 September 2015 - 12:07 PM.

  • 0

"Experience is the hardest teacher. It gives the test first, then the lesson."


#7 mattman578

mattman578

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 168 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 12:24 PM

I think this year I am going to get my Webelos to raise there own money to go on a high adventure camping trip buy doing a pink flamingos fundraiser.  My big issue with fund raisers is the low profit margin. 

 

if you want more info on a pink flamingos fundraiser please follow this link http://www.flamingofundraising.com/


  • 0

#8 blw2

blw2

    Troop Treasurer

  • Members
  • 2000 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 12:55 PM

love it @Stosh!

 

and I agree with you @desertrat77

 

I understand the idea of expanding the boys', approaching people, selling, hard work, and all of that

but I'm not convinced it really works.

The boys that are not shy sell.  Some of them sell big

The shy kids will still be shy, even after they are tortured by being made to knock on doors.  They will be no more likely to want to sell more, no more likely to come out of their shell.... well maybe 1 out of 100 will, but that's all just theoretical...

 

How do I know?  I was that shy kid being forced to sell decorative candles, candy, and other stuff I knew that nobody wanted... torture.  i hated it.  In fact it was one reason I wasn't so gung ho about participating in scouts and such!

I eventually came out of my shell, but it had nothing to do with those fundraisers.


  • 0

#9 CA Scout Mom

CA Scout Mom

    Member

  • Members
  • 30 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 03:24 PM

There are other ways to do fundraising, of course, besides selling popcorn. Scouts could offer to do work for a local organization or have a pancake breakfast or spaghetti dinner at the location of their meetings.  I think selling is a great skill for boys and in our troop, as I expect in most others, there are the "Show and Sell" opportunities in front of grocery markets, home improvement centers, etc.  Since that's a group effort, that makes it more fun for the shy Scouts.  But, yes, for many of our parents, myself included,  have come to realize that in some situations it's going to be more efficient to make the donation.  I was the adult coordinator in charge of the spaghetti dinner fundraiser last spring and in the end, donated over $250 in supplies and groceries, in order to make the fundraiser more successful.  Was happy to do it but that wasn't really the point although it did raise the troop's visibility at the church where our troop meets.


  • 0

#10 vumbi

vumbi

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 179 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 03:40 PM

For many years, I've been more than happy to write a check to avoid peddling stale/overpriced candy/popcorn/cookies, smelly candles and other junk that no one really wants.

 

If they need help setting up the school carnival, hauling gear for the troop, or serving as a timer at the swim meet, sure, no problem.   Selling stuff?   No.  I will not impose on family, coworkers and neighbors to buy rubbish to support my kid.

I agree completely. Plus the boys know that what they're 'selling' is way overpriced and this kind of activity sets an example of unreasonable expectation.


  • 1

#11 desertrat77

desertrat77

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2252 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 04:00 PM

Another point to consider:  fundraising of yesteryear is not the same as today.

 

As a scout, I might sell scout-o-rama tickets (wow I feel old typing that) or candy bars for camp.   One troop, we sold trees at Christmas.    Brief periods of hard work, but nothing too strenuous. 

 

In years past, there were fundraisers by various groups and teams, but nothing what we see today.

 

Today:  be it scouting, sports, PTA, band, etc., the peddling is year-round.   Even if isn't year-round for the youth selling the items, it sure seems like a continual drip/drip/drip to the friends and neighbors that are pressed to buy this stuff.   It gets very old.   Expensive.   And most of dollars go to a middle man.


Edited by desertrat77, 03 September 2015 - 04:01 PM.

  • 0

#12 desertrat77

desertrat77

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2252 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 04:10 PM


How do I know?  I was that shy kid being forced to sell decorative candles, candy, and other stuff I knew that nobody wanted... torture.  i hated it. 

Blw2, you just described me as a scout!   I pressed forward and achieved the bare minimum (the sales patch for the scoutorama, the BSA first aid kit, etc) just to do my part, but I did not like peddling.   Like you, I knew people didn't want to buy.   Truly it was painful.   I was always relieved when the sales campaign was over.   I liked scouting, but not the fundraising.

 

To go to Philmont as a scout, we didn't have any fundraisers.   It was up to each scout.  I gladly mowed lawns.   Useful, meaningful work, and easy to make the pitch.

 

On the other hand, I didn't mind selling Christmas trees as a scout.   Our troop raised enough money in three weeks to last the whole year.   People who drove up to the lot wanted buy a tree, and it was a friendly environment.   Not like knocking on a stranger's door and making a sales pitch.


Edited by desertrat77, 03 September 2015 - 04:11 PM.

  • 1

#13 Rick_in_CA

Rick_in_CA

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 703 posts

Posted 03 September 2015 - 05:04 PM

I think this year I am going to get my Webelos to raise there own money to go on a high adventure camping trip buy doing a pink flamingos fundraiser.  My big issue with fund raisers is the low profit margin. 

 

if you want more info on a pink flamingos fundraiser please follow this link http://www.flamingofundraising.com/

The pink flamingos fundraiser is an interesting idea. I'm not sure it would get council approval though (I guess you can argue it is selling a service). Do you know anyone that has done it?


  • 0

#14 Krampus

Krampus

    Side Kick to Nikolaus

  • Members
  • 1870 posts

Posted 04 September 2015 - 09:57 AM

I think this year I am going to get my Webelos to raise there own money to go on a high adventure camping trip buy doing a pink flamingos fundraiser.  My big issue with fund raisers is the low profit margin. 

 

if you want more info on a pink flamingos fundraiser please follow this link http://www.flamingofundraising.com/

 

What do you do with them once you sell them? I guess I don't understand what they are for. Is this a regional thing?

 

My first reaction was to say, "what the flock?".


  • 0

#15 mattman578

mattman578

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 168 posts

Posted 04 September 2015 - 11:14 AM

the fun part about the pink flamingo fundraiser is the following

 

you sell people insurance so that flamingos do not end up on there lawn

you sell people the right to pick whose lawn the flamingos spend 24 hours 

you sell the person the right who got flocked to name whose next

 

you keep the flamingo's for next year they do not eat much

two flocks of flamingos cost $224 you can sell the insurance for 20 or 10 and the flocking for 20 or 10

you are proving a service because you are playing a piratical joke on somebody friend

 

 

when sombody gets flocked you put a really big sing in there yard that says they have been flocked by your org

 

and my nephew did this to raise money for a trip he was taking with just him and his dad they made around 3000.00 in a month

 

so guys think about it how many people do you know who would love to have pink flamingos on there front lawn send me 20.00 and there address and I will make sure it works


  • 0

#16 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 04 September 2015 - 12:16 PM

Sounds like a goat raffle but that doesn't cost anything but the ticket printing and getting a goat donated.


  • 0

#17 mattman578

mattman578

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 168 posts

Posted 04 September 2015 - 02:01 PM

Sounds like a goat raffle but that doesn't cost anything but the ticket printing and getting a goat donated.

My dad bought a goat at a bar once


  • 0

#18 Krampus

Krampus

    Side Kick to Nikolaus

  • Members
  • 1870 posts

Posted 04 September 2015 - 02:50 PM

So is thing flamingo thing a southern thing? A northern thing? I have never seen or heard of it where I live. Or any place I have lived. I must live a sheltered life.


  • 0

#19 Lurking...

Lurking...

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12252 posts

Posted 04 September 2015 - 02:54 PM

We've had the flamingo thingy here in our town, I think the Rotary did it.  Wisconsin area.


  • 0

#20 vumbi

vumbi

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 179 posts

Posted 04 September 2015 - 03:57 PM

To me fundraising falls into two categories: for the unit and the boys in the unit, and then there is fundraising for the council (perhaps with a percentage for the unit). Both categories consume time that could be devoted to, you know, like, scouting. But at least the first category entirely benefits the unit.

Anyway, trying to stick with the title of this topic, the alternative to fundraising, to me, is to pay the full cost of whatever activity we do; outings, high adventure, awards, camporees, summer camp...it doesn't matter...and if we can't afford it, we don't do it. It's that simple.

This approach has some risks. For one, a family might not be able to afford an activity...and because of that I'm somewhat sympathetic to unit fundraising. Not enthusiastic, just somewhat sympathetic.

As for things beyond the unit, after what I observed in that list of salaries that someone posted a while back, I am probably never going to be enthused about fundraising at that level. I wouldn't attempt to stop some person with more money than sense from donating to the national organization but I would probably discourage engaging the boys in the unit to waste time for that level of fundraising...as opposed to going on another outing of some kind.

As for summer camp, etc., I am always in favor of setting the fees for those things in a way that reflects the actual costs of providing them. No supplements, no subsidies, no 'welfare'. I suspect that when families begin to pay the real cost of camp, that is when they will demand excellence from 'camp' or else the unit might find that excellence in 'camping' on their own, which to me is an excellent and usually superior option.

I guess that's most of what I think about an alternative to fundraising.


  • 0




3 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 3 guests, 0 anonymous users


IPB Skin By Virteq