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Noise At Noac


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#21 SWScouter

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 11:26 PM

From the NOAC Facebook page, Aug. 7:

Breaking News! NOAC 2018 will be hosted at Indiana University!


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#22 frankpalazzi

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Posted 14 August 2015 - 11:59 PM

Pardon me if I'm repeating myself but....

 

 

OH PUH-LEEZ!

 

Find something to do. Perhaps, employment?  Just saying!


Edited by frankpalazzi, 15 August 2015 - 12:07 AM.

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#23 prof

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 09:59 AM

2018 in Indiana!
Welcome home!
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#24 Stosh

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 10:17 AM

Why does NOAC need a university?


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#25 jpstodwftexas

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 11:08 PM

Because NOAC is not about Camping, it is not about Outdoor Activities. It is about Classes and Fancy Shows....

Is That really Breaking News...Has NOAC ever been at a Camp?

 

If The Summitt can't handle NOAC I don't see how it can handle National Jambo and World Jambo..I hear this years World Jambo hosted over 30,000 Scouters


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#26 qwazse

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 08:36 AM

Why does NOAC need a university?

What @jpstodwftexas said (except the part about Summit, which can handle thousands of campers but a limited number of lodgers). Plus ...

 

I think part of the idea is to get boys acquainted with college campuses. It'd be nice if your average welding school could house that many!

 

And, it's sort of why O/A has positioned itself to disallow female youth who are card-carrying members of the BSA ... because the adults at the top wanted it so.


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#27 gumbymaster

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 09:20 AM

I'm also willing to bet that the vast majority of those Scouts and Scouters out there who think it's cool to wear a clan tartan kilt are really certified by the family to do so.

...

 

I AM certified to wear my family's tartan.  I had to prove my genealogy to the correct people in Scotland, but I did get myself certified.  How many women out there claiming to be DAR?  Veterans?  How far do we go before someone raises a red flag?  Maybe one ought not start looking for the line in the sand and just respect the traditions of others. 

While my family qualifies from two separate paths for DAR, and even with the HQ only a few miles away, I actually know very little about representing that link.

 

As for the Tartans, my problem (ok, my Son's, my side didn't qualify), is that the Tartan he's linked to is just so  ugly.


Edited by gumbymaster, 18 August 2015 - 09:21 AM.

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#28 Stosh

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 11:29 AM

While my family qualifies from two separate paths for DAR, and even with the HQ only a few miles away, I actually know very little about representing that link.

 

As for the Tartans, my problem (ok, my Son's, my side didn't qualify), is that the Tartan he's linked to is just so  ugly.

 

Mine too, but you can't pick your family.  :(


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#29 CalicoPenn

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 09:26 AM

I have Scottish ancestry but not of any clan affiliation.  My family comes from Aberdeenshire which does have a tartan of it's own so I could wear the Aberdeen tartan (which is quite a handsome tartan).  The Aberdeen tartan was created sometime between 1746-1782, during the period when tartans were not allowed by order of the King.   It is an example of a district tartan, representing a specific place.  The original tartans, which weren't created until the 1600's, also tended to be tied to a place but not necessarily because it was honoring the place but because the weavers were using threads of colors that were available to them in their locale.  Folks dyed threads using the plants available to them (for instance, goldenrod) and if you lived in an area that didn't have that plant, you probably weren't going to have that color thread on hand (unless you were able to trade for it).

 

Interesting note about clan tartans - we tend to think of clan tartans reaching way back to the 1600's and 1700's and being associated with specific clans way back then - but that's not quite how tartans came to be identified with certain clans.  Tartans may have been informally associated with certain clans before the 1800's but that was mostly due to regionalism (again, weavers working with what they had) and not because of any kind of rule - the Clan McGregor's might have all worn the same style tartan because their weavers used the same pattern and colors for the cloth they used but there might be McGregors wearing other tartans because they traveled and traded for them.  It wasn't until the late 1700's and early 1800's, as tartan societies and makers started to gather patterns in books that the clan tartans started to be exclusively associated with clans - in some cases, when tartan book companies called on clans for their tartan patterns, the elders didn't even know if they had a clan tartan (because they didn't know what a clan tartan was) and  would choose the one most commonly used by their clan.

 

I do, however, and on occasion, wear a tartan but not the Aberdeen tartan.  I wear an "Original State of Maine" tartan kilt (which is not the official Maine tartan though it was created in the 1960's with the intention of being so - the legislature has never created an official tartan).  The kilt was hand woven for me by the copyright holder of the tartan who also happened to be my landlady for a time when I was a student in Maine.  I figure that's permission enough for me to wear it.


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#30 CalicoPenn

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 11:11 AM

Oh jeesh - to clarify something - it's my family that does not have a tartan of it's own, not Aberdeenshire (the Aberdeen tartan is the tartan of Aberdeenshire).


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#31 Horizon

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 01:13 PM

I married into a family with plenty of Scottish origins, but all genealogy work has not found a bit in my background.

 

As for the Native American aspect of the OA - I think that some lodges do a great job of working with the local tribes, but I have seen plenty of Hollywood Indians at OA events as well. The feathered headdress of the Plains Indians is a combination of the religious garb of the Pope plus the medals and hash marks on a decorated Marine. Each feather has meaning, and to many tribes someone else wearing that garb is fairly insulting, regardless of our intent.

 

I don't care about the attitude of the offenderati on the campus, but I do listen to my friends in the Cherokee and Navajo nations when they talk about these subjects. It is something to consider, and would be a great discussion at the Lodge level.


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#32 Gone

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 02:21 PM

Our lodge doesn't have a clue. Our unit spoke with the local nation and got them to help us (actively) dress out our ceremonial team in dress consistent with the role intended. Our songs, music and dance are all consistent with actual dances from our local nation.

 

The lodge looks like a bad B western set when they do their ceremony. It is embarrassing.


Edited by Bad Wolf, 19 August 2015 - 02:21 PM.

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#33 Horizon

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 04:04 PM

That is awesome that your unit did that Bad Wolf. That is type of stuff that makes Scouting work, and gives great memories. 


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#34 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 06:53 PM

Our lodge doesn't have a clue. Our unit spoke with the local nation and got them to help us (actively) dress out our ceremonial team in dress consistent with the role intended. Our songs, music and dance are all consistent with actual dances from our local nation.

 

 

 

Please, please, PLEASE KEEP AT IT (caps for begging ;)  )  I tried for years to get my current chapter to go local, It was slowly getting there, then stopped when I had to concentrate on Cubs.  However, our lodge has picked up on it.  Some chapters still go "Hollywood" but more and more are going local, including mine.


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"Train 'em. Trust 'em. LET THEM LEAD!" William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt


#35 Gone

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 10:53 PM

That is awesome that your unit did that Bad Wolf. That is type of stuff that makes Scouting work, and gives great memories.

  

Please, please, PLEASE KEEP AT IT (caps for begging ;)  )  I tried for years to get my current chapter to go local, It was slowly getting there, then stopped when I had to concentrate on Cubs.  However, our lodge has picked up on it.  Some chapters still go "Hollywood" but more and more are going local, including mine.


Our unit is not looked upon well by the adults in the lodge....mostly the guys who have been around forever and don't want to lose power.

Our kids have three ceremony teams now, do webelos cross overs and we do our own tap outs. Our kids love it and we've even pulled kids from the next district who can't get on the lodge team. At first kids wanted to quit their units and join us, but we said stay in your unit and join us anyway.
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#36 SpEdScouter

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 07:01 PM

Our troop has a native American leader. Problem is he is from Arizona and only knows those tribes which are different than the tribes here in Kansas.


Edited by SpEdScouter, 20 August 2015 - 07:09 PM.

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#37 qwazse

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 12:49 PM

Our troop has a native American leader. Problem is he is from Arizona and only knows those tribes which are different than the tribes here in Kansas.

I'm not sure how that is a problem. The goal is to find what's noble among the tribes in your area and use that as a way of finding nobility among the people around you.

 

I can see a leader from one tribe providing insight on how Arrowmen from his area comported themselves, and using that experience to inform on how the Arrowmen he now knows should grow and learn.


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#38 Gone

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 01:45 PM

Our troop has a native American leader. Problem is he is from Arizona and only knows those tribes which are different than the tribes here in Kansas.

 

I'm from CA but I learned MT real fast. ;) I am sure he can too.


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#39 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 01:50 PM

I had a Lakota sit in on a Indian Lore MB class I did at a local MBC. She wanted to know how to teach the MB andalso learn about the local NC Indians.


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"Train 'em. Trust 'em. LET THEM LEAD!" William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt





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