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Fundraising for the Good of the Whole Troop?


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#21 MrBob

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 08:03 PM

 
FISCAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR BSA UNITS
Can my unit credit amounts from fundraising to an individual toward their expenses?

No. The IRS has stated that crediting fundraising amounts constitutes private benefit. However, the unit could use the funds (all or a percentage) raised to reduce or eliminate dues and various registration fees, purchase uniforms and Scouting books, and purchase camping equipment. The unit could also use its funds to provide assistance to individual Scouts in cases of financial hardship.
 
 
I realize this thread is half-a-year old already, but the above statement pretty much shoots the "ISA funded from Unit fundraisers" right between the eyes.  If you're not fundraising "for the good of the WHOLE troop", you're not only violating BSA policy, you're poking the IRS-bear with a sharp stick.
 
 
Of course, like a lot of Troops, we've been doing exactly that for ... well, forever!  My announcement (as Treasurer) at our next committee meeting that "this must change right now" is going to be a shock to many.  I'm a big dumb guy, and I do a lot of big dumb things, but intentionally firing a shot across the Internal Revenue Service isn't a bedpost notch I wanna carve.

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#22 qwazse

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 09:34 PM

Not gonna argue with a treasurer, @MrBob. You're doing good work, and have a right to do it in a way that you feel complies to the standards you want to uphold.

 

However, the sharpness of this "stick" you speak of depends on the magnitude of a boy's individual benefit. If you're talking about $300-$400 per boy for camp or for boots and a backpack -- training experience and equipment that a troop needs from every boy to be successful, the bear has harder biting flies to fuss over.  If, on the other hand, your troop expects each family to raise tens of thousands of dollars for your boy to retain his membership (precisely the magnitude of sports parents' fundraising that drew an IRS opinion), then you are indeed drawing attention as a bogus tax shelter for parents' extra income!

 

So, however, you choose to present it to your committee, try to avoid excessive drama. And be patient. Who knows? Maybe a couple of other folks in your troop have seen the writing on the wall.


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#23 Gone

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 10:43 PM

Buy water balloons with that money you not only get the IRS on you but BSA's version of ATF.
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#24 nola

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 08:34 AM

If everyone is able to participate then it doesn't make a difference if it's troop wide or scout account. The problem is when not everyone participates. But I believe the units have a responsibility to make it possible for every scout to participate to the maximum by setting up show and sells and not just giving them an order form and saying have at it boys!

If the opportunities are there and you just don't take them to sell then get out your checkbook.
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#25 Lurking...

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 01:08 PM

Scouting is a brotherhood, one hangs together with the patrol members, and they specifically take care of their buddy.  EXCEPT when it comes to the money, then all bets are off and MY money doesn't count when it comes to any cooperative efforts and if you don't work at selling stuff, you can stay home or pay up.

 

How does one get past the "Show Scout spirit" requirement with an attitude like that?


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#26 ShootingSports

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 02:50 PM

Interesting read on replies and I get the points.  What to do if one or two of the scouts in the Patrol want to go to Philmont or Jamboree?


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#27 Lurking...

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 03:10 PM

Interesting read on replies and I get the points.  What to do if one or two of the scouts in the Patrol want to go to Philmont or Jamboree?

 

Then his buddies roll up their sleeves and make sure they get them to Philmont or Jambouree.  Help other people at all times.... that includes your best friends/buddies in the patrol.  Once one gets to that level in the patrols/troop, then some of the MY Eagle, MY scouting experience, MY money in  MY scout account.... MY.... starts going away.  It's that kind of thinking that makes the best Paper Eagles.  Until a scout begins to quit worrying about himself and starts thinking about others, he's never going to figure out what Scouting is really all about.  For sure, they'll never figure out what servant leadership is all about.  

 

Once one has a kid come around on that point, the next step is to work on his parents, too.


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#28 qwazse

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:58 PM

Then his buddies roll up their sleeves and make sure they get them to Philmont or Jambouree.  Help other people at all times.... that includes your best friends/buddies in the patrol.  Once one gets to that level in the patrols/troop, then some of the MY Eagle, MY scouting experience, MY money in  MY scout account.... MY.... starts going away.  It's that kind of thinking that makes the best Paper Eagles.  Until a scout begins to quit worrying about himself and starts thinking about others, he's never going to figure out what Scouting is really all about.  For sure, they'll never figure out what servant leadership is all about.  

 

Once one has a kid come around on that point, the next step is to work on his parents, too.

Yep, my friends helped me sell some of Mamma's hard-tack candy so I could do Jambo (and some other things).

 

Just to flip @Stosh's argument around, you might have a boy who sees his expenses as an extra burden on the patrol, and works his job and personal life to pay for his junkets. One of our Eagles had an established lawn care business that payed for HA's, tech school, and employed a few other boys.

 

Sometimes, I lent my (scout/non-scout) buddies a hand doing their jobs. I wasn't thinking of the "end game". They had a job to do, I had time. Still see it happening, although employment regulations make it a little less likely.

 

If you want an iron-clad financial system that fairly accounts for these random acts of kindness, look elsewhere. A boy's sense of fairness hinges more on who you will or will not allow to have a scoutmaster conference.


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#29 boomerscout

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 01:33 PM

Not helping others shows a lack of Scout Spirit.  No Scout Spirit, no advancement.  Problem solved.

 

Most fundraisers fail not because the Scouts don't want to do them and share, but because the Scouters have designed a really half-assed event


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#30 Lurking...

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 02:20 PM

Not helping others shows a lack of Scout Spirit.  No Scout Spirit, no advancement.  Problem solved.

 

Most fundraisers fail not because the Scouts don't want to do them and share, but because the Scouters have designed a really half-assed event

@boomerscout  

 

I know it's just a typo, but the moderators might take issue with your spelling.  The proper spelling is half-fast.  Be more careful next time.


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#31 Krampus

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 02:49 PM

I thought he was talking about a half a donkey. 


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#32 Lurking...

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 02:53 PM

My apologies, I stand corrected!   :blink:


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