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Can I bring my younger son to scout campouts?


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#21 Basementdweller

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:17 PM

Seriously?

What do a Tiger Cub and Senior in high school have in common? A single parent maybe? Why is the troop putting that kind of pressure on the parent? Either you find a babysitter and show up or the troop will have to cancel it's outing.

C'mon, is that really fair? A program needs to be a lot more robust than that. We all have conflicts on our calendars. Flexibility and coordination is needed to make it happen.

My wife will be out of town that weekend, and I have to stay home with Little Johnny. I can drive up a few of the boys, but I can't stay. I can come back on Sunday to pick them up.

Yes, I have done that myself. My boy has two sisters.

Jeff

I have two ASM's, one is on rotating shifts so it is a crap shoot as to whether he will be off on any given weekends, so what if the other is sick or can't make it.

Cancelled outing or try to recruit a parent to attend as well.
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#22 moosetracker

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 01:15 PM

I agree jblake.. Amazing how many people have made a troop outing into a Pack family campout.. Totally unfair to the boys in the troop, both the ones who want to get away from their family and their family tags along, and the boys whose family doesn't tag along and they still have toddlers biting him at the ankles because Sammy & Johnny brought their families with 3 and 4 year olds in tow.. That troop would need to be very, very hard up for Adult leadership to ever accept falling into this type of disarray.

Our family didn't have younger children as my son was an only child. Still when the troop camp, my husband went as an adult leader, my son went and I stayed home, even though I have camped since I was a child.. Sorry, troop camping is not family camping, and I think the boy scout age appropriate chart states by age what is and is not acceptable.

On top of that, by the way the OP wrote it, this is simply someone thinking his young son is exceptional, and wants to accelerate his scouting career.. Why not an 8 year old Eagle..

jblake my comment was mostly to Basement, who stated my argument did not hold water, because he took his son in a situation where the troop was dieing out and it was him and his son, or the event didn't happen.. Which I am stating my argument isn't against him because he meets my exclusion of the troop better be in dire need to agree to this..
But, that holds with your statement also.. You both are making up these "maybe" statements of talking yourself into a scenario that it is perfectly acceptable due to the troop is in dire need, if he doesn't go the trip is canceled and the troop folds.. Which I state, that is the only reason to even consider this.. BUT.. the OP does not say one word, that anything like that is the reason.. It is just because thinks it would be great to spend time with wolf scout in this environment. That is all the reasoning he is presenting.. You guys are supplying the what-if dying troop scenarios in order to give him the green light.
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#23 moosetracker

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 01:18 PM

Seriously?

What do a Tiger Cub and Senior in high school have in common? A single parent maybe? Why is the troop putting that kind of pressure on the parent? Either you find a babysitter and show up or the troop will have to cancel it's outing.

C'mon, is that really fair? A program needs to be a lot more robust than that. We all have conflicts on our calendars. Flexibility and coordination is needed to make it happen.

My wife will be out of town that weekend, and I have to stay home with Little Johnny. I can drive up a few of the boys, but I can't stay. I can come back on Sunday to pick them up.

Yes, I have done that myself. My boy has two sisters.

Jeff

And... AGAIN where does the OP have any back story like the one you just gave Jblake.. Again.. he just states he want to take his wolf son on troop events for the "fun" of it..
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#24 NeverAnEagle

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 03:10 PM

I'm all for brining the younger son. I did it for two years and it motivated my younger son and made him ever more eager to join the "big boys." In fact my youngest has his eagle board of review tonight; my older son is still star. Go and have fun. After all, scouting is supposed to be fun.
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#25 duckfoot

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 04:03 PM

I'm throwing the BS flag. Heaven forbid a boy goes along on a boy scout trip. By all means, keep those younger boys at home so they can't experience what a troop actually does. Keep them home and do the arts and crafts like they are supposed to. Once they get it in their heads there is more to the program than that, the whole thing could collapse.

Are your programs that shallow that an ASM is an integral part of any trip?

Moose, OP wants to bring his younger son on a troop campout. Just because the younger son is a wolf makes no difference in the world. That has no bearing on the son and dad camping with the troop, he's just being a son, not a scout.

Base, being thin on adult leadership is not the same as having a shallow program. Thin I can understand, shallow just means the boys aren't being allowed to lead, the adults have to birddog them to death....
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#26 Stosh

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 04:04 PM

Seriously?

What do a Tiger Cub and Senior in high school have in common? A single parent maybe? Why is the troop putting that kind of pressure on the parent? Either you find a babysitter and show up or the troop will have to cancel it's outing.

C'mon, is that really fair? A program needs to be a lot more robust than that. We all have conflicts on our calendars. Flexibility and coordination is needed to make it happen.

My wife will be out of town that weekend, and I have to stay home with Little Johnny. I can drive up a few of the boys, but I can't stay. I can come back on Sunday to pick them up.

Yes, I have done that myself. My boy has two sisters.

Jeff

Okay, you have SM (adult #1) and ASM (adult #2) and his small son along on a trip. SM isn't happy about it, but he goes along because he needs ASM for 2-deep. Well the boys want to do a 15 mile day hike. Well, small son can't walk that far, so the boys can't do that. Well the older boys (300' away) decide to do an activity, but Adults and small son are off by themselves and small son is now bored to death by 10:00 am, and wants to go home. According to BSA policy, that activity is now cancelled, ASM has to take small son home so he can play his video games.

:)

Sure these are all made up scenarios, but I've been around youth for 40+ years and know that when the best laid plans of mice and men are in place, there's always something out there that can jump up bite you in the butt and you never saw it coming.

One boy twisting an ankle at Philmont will basically bring that day's hike to a screeching halt. And that's even with everyone that is supposed to be there is.

Sometimes problems find you, but why go looking for them?

Stosh
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#27 duckfoot

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 04:23 PM

Seriously?

What do a Tiger Cub and Senior in high school have in common? A single parent maybe? Why is the troop putting that kind of pressure on the parent? Either you find a babysitter and show up or the troop will have to cancel it's outing.

C'mon, is that really fair? A program needs to be a lot more robust than that. We all have conflicts on our calendars. Flexibility and coordination is needed to make it happen.

My wife will be out of town that weekend, and I have to stay home with Little Johnny. I can drive up a few of the boys, but I can't stay. I can come back on Sunday to pick them up.

Yes, I have done that myself. My boy has two sisters.

Jeff

Tell me where it says you need adult leadership at all on that 15 mile day hike? ASM and son stay back at camp or go on as much of that hike as they want. SM and the rest of the troop carry on. Where's the issue?
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#28 Eagle92

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 07:26 PM

I am basing my opinion on a negative expereince. As a Scout, we had a trip turn into a "family" trip b/c we could not get enough drivers. Long story short, it was a nightmare because after a year of planning for the trip, we couldn't do what we set out to do, and the siblings caused major damage to the place we were staying.
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#29 Stosh

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 08:00 AM

Seriously?

What do a Tiger Cub and Senior in high school have in common? A single parent maybe? Why is the troop putting that kind of pressure on the parent? Either you find a babysitter and show up or the troop will have to cancel it's outing.

C'mon, is that really fair? A program needs to be a lot more robust than that. We all have conflicts on our calendars. Flexibility and coordination is needed to make it happen.

My wife will be out of town that weekend, and I have to stay home with Little Johnny. I can drive up a few of the boys, but I can't stay. I can come back on Sunday to pick them up.

Yes, I have done that myself. My boy has two sisters.

Jeff

Gotta read the whole story. The 15 mile hike wasn't the problem. The problem lies in the fact that at any time the little guy wants to go home, HE makes the decision for the whole group.

Stosh
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#30 moosetracker

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 10:23 AM

Seriously?

What do a Tiger Cub and Senior in high school have in common? A single parent maybe? Why is the troop putting that kind of pressure on the parent? Either you find a babysitter and show up or the troop will have to cancel it's outing.

C'mon, is that really fair? A program needs to be a lot more robust than that. We all have conflicts on our calendars. Flexibility and coordination is needed to make it happen.

My wife will be out of town that weekend, and I have to stay home with Little Johnny. I can drive up a few of the boys, but I can't stay. I can come back on Sunday to pick them up.

Yes, I have done that myself. My boy has two sisters.

Jeff

Not only that, although troops are different.. I know in my sons' troop, the older boys had some difficulty with the younger incoming scouts.. Sometimes the little guys were fine, and cool.. But, if they start whining, or being too goofy or are reluctant about doing work, or make an extra mess and then walk off for someone else to fix.. That's for 10.5 to 11 year olds.. They just wouldn't be more tolerant for a kid of 6 or 7 who shouldn't even be on the trip.

Then also my sons' troop for a long time had great SM's but the last year (and for several years after) they had a SM who was there for his sons only.. Everything was for their son's advancement, what their son wanted to do, it was just known.. It was not well received.. Even when he was not SM but just ASM and he wiggled for the privilege of his sons the boys knew it, and it was not well received. This guy was SM for over 5 years, and except for his sons ECOH's all the other scouts who made eagle called and asked for past SM's to please come back to be part of their ceremony and either gave the current SM nothing in the program to do, or they gave them something very minimal, and only because some adult said it was not courteous to not give him a part in the program.. His son's really did not fare much better in the minds of the boys in this troop.. They were not seen as 'earning' their eagle, but more having the road paved for them by Daddy..

So, yes, it is my inferring my own personal history to this story, but at least I have got the OP statement, and I am not making backstories up about "What if".. But, if the outing is not about his interest in the boys of the troop having a good trip, or the good of the troop, and nothing this being the only option, there being no other.. But, simply that bringing his scout to something he is really not old enough to be at, is all about his relationship with his son.. Then, sorry, this would be an ASM I would not ask to attend the event unless he was the last option. He is not there for the benefit of the troop. Boy's of a troop know when their adult Leaders are giving their son unfair preferential treatment, that the only reason they take a position is to give their son's some preferential treatment. Their resentment does not go away with time, it just gets worse.

Now, if you did bring your son's to a BS outing due to it being the only option you had, and you thought it was best for the troop and best for the boys of the troop, to deal with your young child then miss the trip.. I would think the boys of your troop will figure it out. It would be through your young child only coming when it was absolutely necessary, not whenever possible. It would be with you working to keep the child occupied and out of the older boys way, rather then expecting the older boys to curtail their plans to cater to him, or to expect them to take him with whenever possible. It would be by you verbally and in deed, showing them that the trip was all about the Boys in the troop, and not about getting your young son to be a boys scout years before he was mentally and physically and maturity wise ready to be.

Bottom line, your reasoning for bringing young child with you is key.. If it is for the benefit of your young son and you.. Then you have lost me.. BSA rules aren't bent for those reason.. BSA rules are enforced, emboldened, and printed on your forehead.
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#31 qwazse

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:40 PM

Blake, you know there is no one size fits all formula in scouting.

Some troops are more adult rec club than boy scout troop, others have near zero adult involvement

I am a HUGE opponent of the Adult/Family Scout troop, there is a huge difference between an ASM bringing his scout son along VS ASM bringing Wife, and 3 daughters or worse yet 15 year old daughter.

Again, I would ask the PLC what their opinion is.......Then live by their decision.

Not necessarily, MT. Our SPL/PLs have the option of extending an invite to our crew (or, any other unit, for that matter) for any troop activity. They usually don't.

There's this illusion among scouters that it's like flies to honey. But boys ain't flies, and though generally sweet, girls ain't honey.

My boots-on-the-ground experience concurs with BD. Bring it up at the PLC. The boys generally have a good sense about this sort of thing.
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#32 moosetracker

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 06:33 PM

I'm throwing the BS flag. Heaven forbid a boy goes along on a boy scout trip. By all means, keep those younger boys at home so they can't experience what a troop actually does. Keep them home and do the arts and crafts like they are supposed to. Once they get it in their heads there is more to the program than that, the whole thing could collapse.

Are your programs that shallow that an ASM is an integral part of any trip?

Fine then invite all the parents and all the siblings on the Troop outings.
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#33 duckfoot

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 09:38 AM

I'm throwing the BS flag. Heaven forbid a boy goes along on a boy scout trip. By all means, keep those younger boys at home so they can't experience what a troop actually does. Keep them home and do the arts and crafts like they are supposed to. Once they get it in their heads there is more to the program than that, the whole thing could collapse.

Are your programs that shallow that an ASM is an integral part of any trip?

So you'd cancel the entire trip rather than let one non scout boy go? That really helps the scouts...

I'm sorry but I fail to see how one non scout son ruins a camping weekend.
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#34 duckfoot

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 09:54 AM

Well newtoscoutsdad, pick your answer from the flame war here or you can ask the guy to give you your real answer...That would be your Scoutmaster.
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#35 Sentinel947

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:57 PM

Well newtoscoutsdad, pick your answer from the flame war here or you can ask the guy to give you your real answer...That would be your Scoutmaster.

Not necessarily a flame war. There are many different schools of thought on various subjects of Scouting. Part of the strength of this forum is giving people asking questions as many possible opinions and angles of view as possible .
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#36 GeorgiaMom

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 03:51 PM

Dear NewToScoutsDad, from AlmostNewToScoutsMom, I totally sympathize and understand your position. I have a younger daughter who had to attend with me when my son's Cub Scout pack needed me last year. My husband often works late, and is often called to work unexpectedly. We have no family where we live now, and I cannot afford to pay a sitter $50 so that I can go volunteer. Therefore, my daughter often accompanied me. She was quiet and well behaved, more so than some of the Tiger Cubs. I think every pack and every troop are a bit different. The comments indicating that younger children of either gender are an annoyance hit me in a sore spot due to the behavior of the leaders of my particular pack. Your mileage may vary. In our pack, only 3 dads volunteer: CM, CC, and the camping coordinator (whose son will bridge this year). Everything else is done by the moms. We all have younger children, boys and girls. Two of the lady volunteers have young babies. After leaving the post of Treasurer this summer (details in other posts), I started volunteering with American Heritage Girls this year on behalf of my daughter. It is a much more pleasant atmosphere in which to volunteer than Cub Scouts was for me. There are some things in AHG culture that I think would be a nice addition to Scouting: 1. AHG Troops integrate different ages instead of separating them all the time. This is not to say that the older girls don't get a chance to focus only on themselves and age appropriate activities. They absolutely do. However, it is part of the older girls' training to lead the younger girls in activities from time to time. This fall, the older girls have organized a hike, leading the younger girls. They also organized a sleepover for the girls. I am grateful my 7 year old daughter has these very sharp and professional young ladies of 12-15 or so to look up to. They are wonderful role models. I believe it is also a good teaching experience for the older girls to learn to lead. Isn't leadership a trait Scouts should be learning? 2. AHG does a better job of making it easy for parents to volunteer and integrate their other children than the BSA, in my opinion, having volunteered for both groups. My son often accompanies me to his sister's meetings because our family situation requires it. He sometimes participates, as he did with our "box of goodies for the troops" project this week. Sometimes, he works on his homework. Not once has anyone in AHG complained. What the BSA has communicated to me as a parent is that they expect me to be a BSA volunteer first, and a parent to my own kids (all of them) second. I can't do that. I got tired of my daughter being left out. I got her into a program that was good for her, and took my volunteer time along with me. So have many of the other very tired moms in our pack. Maybe some packs and troops are so flush with volunteers that they can afford to make it obnoxious to volunteer for the BSA. I don't really understand the BSA's reasoning. My son's CM and CC both need to pull their heads out. I fully expect they will be looking around in a year with no other volunteers at all dimly trying to figure out what happened and why they're stuck doing everything themselves. My jaw hit the floor when our CC this fall had the gall to call my friend whose son is in my son's den and ask her to do all the shopping for the fall campout (about 100 people). On 24 hours notice. She was 8 1/2 months pregnant at the time with two younger children and was in pain just walking. But, hey, like the CC said, she has a Costco membership and can save the pack money. And she's been way too nice to them for the last two years. She has quit completely as a Scout volunteer. Maybe if they'd been a little more polite and reasonable, she might have been willing to come back. Now, she's pissed and will likely never volunteer for the BSA again, justifiably. So, when I read notes like the one in this thread complaining about how all those pesky younger siblings get in the way and the adult volunteers should make other arrangements so they can put the troop first, I just shake my head and hope the BSA will get a clue before they lose any more adults willing to volunteer. GA Mom
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#37 Eagle92

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 05:02 PM

Georgia, I feel for ya. Yep every unit is different and situations varies. And what you pack leadership did to the pregnant mom was uncalled for. Now in regards to what the BSA says, Cub Scouts is FAMILY (emphasis, not shouting) oriented, with families attending activities, and sometimes even a few meetings. Camp Outs are Family oriented, and a good pack and district/council event will have activities for Cub Scout siblings to do. Does it happen all the time, no. Best example I can give is my CSDC. National does permit a "tot lot" "sibling den" whatever you want to call it, and discusses it at National Camping School. Problem is not every district has the resources to pull it off. Last year was the first year we had one in the 4 years I've worked it. The siblings had the ability to do everything the Cubs did. Now Boy Scouts is completely different in that it is oriented to the INDIVIDUAL ( again emphasis). We try to grow the Scouts physcially, mentally, and morally. Our job is to guide and mentor, but THEY take charge and do the planning. And I can tell you from first hand expereince, if siblings ruin a troop's expereince, especially one that took a year for the youth to plan, involved a 14 hour round trip car ride because the parents didn't it think it was fair for the Scouts to do the activities in the rain and the siblings are not ready for it, and then the siblings cause several hundred dollars worth of plumbing damage at the place you are staying, the BOY SCOUTS ( again emphasis, not shouting) will consider their siblings an "annoyance" and will state no more siblings will be allowed on their trips. Yep the above happened in my troop, and it was 5 or 6 years before the youth allowed siblings along on camp outs again. All the youth at the time of the original incident either quit or were adults before the PLC again allowed another family camp out. SSSSSOOOOOOOO, NewToScoutsDad, why don't you ask the Patrol Leaders' Council, the ones who plan, prepare, and execute the camp outs to see if they want your son tagging along or not.
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#38 moosetracker

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 05:07 PM

Dear NewToScoutsDad, from AlmostNewToScoutsMom,

I totally sympathize and understand your position. I have a younger daughter who had to attend with me when my son's Cub Scout pack needed me last year.

My husband often works late, and is often called to work unexpectedly. We have no family where we live now, and I cannot afford to pay a sitter $50 so that I can go volunteer. Therefore, my daughter often accompanied me. She was quiet and well behaved, more so than some of the Tiger Cubs.

I think every pack and every troop are a bit different. The comments indicating that younger children of either gender are an annoyance hit me in a sore spot due to the behavior of the leaders of my particular pack. Your mileage may vary.

In our pack, only 3 dads volunteer: CM, CC, and the camping coordinator (whose son will bridge this year). Everything else is done by the moms. We all have younger children, boys and girls. Two of the lady volunteers have young babies.

After leaving the post of Treasurer this summer (details in other posts), I started volunteering with American Heritage Girls this year on behalf of my daughter. It is a much more pleasant atmosphere in which to volunteer than Cub Scouts was for me. There are some things in AHG culture that I think would be a nice addition to Scouting:

1. AHG Troops integrate different ages instead of separating them all the time. This is not to say that the older girls don't get a chance to focus only on themselves and age appropriate activities. They absolutely do.

However, it is part of the older girls' training to lead the younger girls in activities from time to time. This fall, the older girls have organized a hike, leading the younger girls. They also organized a sleepover for the girls.

I am grateful my 7 year old daughter has these very sharp and professional young ladies of 12-15 or so to look up to. They are wonderful role models. I believe it is also a good teaching experience for the older girls to learn to lead. Isn't leadership a trait Scouts should be learning?

2. AHG does a better job of making it easy for parents to volunteer and integrate their other children than the BSA, in my opinion, having volunteered for both groups. My son often accompanies me to his sister's meetings because our family situation requires it. He sometimes participates, as he did with our "box of goodies for the troops" project this week. Sometimes, he works on his homework. Not once has anyone in AHG complained.

What the BSA has communicated to me as a parent is that they expect me to be a BSA volunteer first, and a parent to my own kids (all of them) second. I can't do that. I got tired of my daughter being left out. I got her into a program that was good for her, and took my volunteer time along with me. So have many of the other very tired moms in our pack. Maybe some packs and troops are so flush with volunteers that they can afford to make it obnoxious to volunteer for the BSA. I don't really understand the BSA's reasoning.

My son's CM and CC both need to pull their heads out. I fully expect they will be looking around in a year with no other volunteers at all dimly trying to figure out what happened and why they're stuck doing everything themselves.

My jaw hit the floor when our CC this fall had the gall to call my friend whose son is in my son's den and ask her to do all the shopping for the fall campout (about 100 people). On 24 hours notice. She was 8 1/2 months pregnant at the time with two younger children and was in pain just walking. But, hey, like the CC said, she has a Costco membership and can save the pack money. And she's been way too nice to them for the last two years. She has quit completely as a Scout volunteer. Maybe if they'd been a little more polite and reasonable, she might have been willing to come back. Now, she's pissed and will likely never volunteer for the BSA again, justifiably.

So, when I read notes like the one in this thread complaining about how all those pesky younger siblings get in the way and the adult volunteers should make other arrangements so they can put the troop first, I just shake my head and hope the BSA will get a clue before they lose any more adults willing to volunteer.

GA Mom

GeorgiaMom - Cub scouts should be more open to other siblings It is promoted as family oriented, and expects family participation. The training given to new Leaders even discusses at least for pack campouts planning a program for all siblings younger and older, not just the scouts. But even aside from pack camping, it is billed as family oriented.. Boy Scouts it is not.. But the Boy scouts do teach younger scouts.. The 10.5 to 11yo new recruits are who they train..

I also do not expect people to make other arrangements and go on troop outings.. I do expect them to stay home with their younger sons if that is who they want to spend the time with. The troop should only agree to an adult volunteer on a trip with a younger sibling in tow, only if that is the only way they can go on the outing.. This isn't a demand they find a sitter.. But, is simply a fact that the youngster in tow on a boy scout outing should be avoided if at all possible.. Not the case with Cub scouts.

So, it is be a parent to your younger children first, but if that means staying home with them, or better yet doing something that interests them, then do it.. At the Pack level, they should not only accept family attendance, but plan for it. At the troop level they should not. You make your priorities and choose.. Don't feel guilty if you do not choose the troop.

The 24 hours notice was uncalled for.. No one alone should be expected to shop for 100 people, that really should be divvied out to different people.. I can't believe she is the only one out of that many people with a Costco card, and if others can't be bothered helping to organize the outing, they can just deal with paying more for the food.. At the very least, considering her condition, they should have suggested if they could meet her at an arranged time at Costco, the able bodied volunteers do all the shopping and just ask if she would use her card when they were in check out.. But, that would be the very least.. I more think others going on the trip should help coordinate the outing.
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#39 Scouter99

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 12:45 PM

Dear NewToScoutsDad, from AlmostNewToScoutsMom,

I totally sympathize and understand your position. I have a younger daughter who had to attend with me when my son's Cub Scout pack needed me last year.

My husband often works late, and is often called to work unexpectedly. We have no family where we live now, and I cannot afford to pay a sitter $50 so that I can go volunteer. Therefore, my daughter often accompanied me. She was quiet and well behaved, more so than some of the Tiger Cubs.

I think every pack and every troop are a bit different. The comments indicating that younger children of either gender are an annoyance hit me in a sore spot due to the behavior of the leaders of my particular pack. Your mileage may vary.

In our pack, only 3 dads volunteer: CM, CC, and the camping coordinator (whose son will bridge this year). Everything else is done by the moms. We all have younger children, boys and girls. Two of the lady volunteers have young babies.

After leaving the post of Treasurer this summer (details in other posts), I started volunteering with American Heritage Girls this year on behalf of my daughter. It is a much more pleasant atmosphere in which to volunteer than Cub Scouts was for me. There are some things in AHG culture that I think would be a nice addition to Scouting:

1. AHG Troops integrate different ages instead of separating them all the time. This is not to say that the older girls don't get a chance to focus only on themselves and age appropriate activities. They absolutely do.

However, it is part of the older girls' training to lead the younger girls in activities from time to time. This fall, the older girls have organized a hike, leading the younger girls. They also organized a sleepover for the girls.

I am grateful my 7 year old daughter has these very sharp and professional young ladies of 12-15 or so to look up to. They are wonderful role models. I believe it is also a good teaching experience for the older girls to learn to lead. Isn't leadership a trait Scouts should be learning?

2. AHG does a better job of making it easy for parents to volunteer and integrate their other children than the BSA, in my opinion, having volunteered for both groups. My son often accompanies me to his sister's meetings because our family situation requires it. He sometimes participates, as he did with our "box of goodies for the troops" project this week. Sometimes, he works on his homework. Not once has anyone in AHG complained.

What the BSA has communicated to me as a parent is that they expect me to be a BSA volunteer first, and a parent to my own kids (all of them) second. I can't do that. I got tired of my daughter being left out. I got her into a program that was good for her, and took my volunteer time along with me. So have many of the other very tired moms in our pack. Maybe some packs and troops are so flush with volunteers that they can afford to make it obnoxious to volunteer for the BSA. I don't really understand the BSA's reasoning.

My son's CM and CC both need to pull their heads out. I fully expect they will be looking around in a year with no other volunteers at all dimly trying to figure out what happened and why they're stuck doing everything themselves.

My jaw hit the floor when our CC this fall had the gall to call my friend whose son is in my son's den and ask her to do all the shopping for the fall campout (about 100 people). On 24 hours notice. She was 8 1/2 months pregnant at the time with two younger children and was in pain just walking. But, hey, like the CC said, she has a Costco membership and can save the pack money. And she's been way too nice to them for the last two years. She has quit completely as a Scout volunteer. Maybe if they'd been a little more polite and reasonable, she might have been willing to come back. Now, she's pissed and will likely never volunteer for the BSA again, justifiably.

So, when I read notes like the one in this thread complaining about how all those pesky younger siblings get in the way and the adult volunteers should make other arrangements so they can put the troop first, I just shake my head and hope the BSA will get a clue before they lose any more adults willing to volunteer.

GA Mom

One more person who conflates a bad situation with their local unit to "THE BSA." The pack you were with might be obnoxious, that does not make "The BSA" obnoxious.

#40 RichardB

RichardB

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 02:41 PM

Here is how the FAQ on the subject is worded. Source page: http://www.scouting....ty/gen_faq.aspx And yes, it directly quotes the GTSS. However, to the OP, would you think differently if you had a wolf age or even a 16 yr old daughter? Would you bring her along?......Neither situation is part of the Boy Scout Program, it is just not scouting. There are some specific family oriented events by design - like Day Camp tot lots or PTC where family programming is included. This would not be one of those.

Q. Can a leader bring his or her younger children on a troop campout?
A.
The Camping section of the Guide to Safe Scouting states:

“If a well-meaning leader brings along a child who does not meet these age guidelines, disservice is done to the unit because of distractions often caused by younger children. A disservice is also done to the child, who is not trained to participate in such an activity and who, as a nonmember of the group, may be ignored by the older campers.”


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