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Life Skills merit badge


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#21 Stosh

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 08:33 AM

I got a question for the group.


So explain to me again. Aren't most of the things your discussing here things that their Parents are supposed to be teaching them at home??????

Yet year after year we see boys who have never made a piece of toast or PB&J entering the troop. Pretty sure my son can change the brakes on my truck, change a flat tire, sew his patches on his uniform, shower and make himself dinner after he is done.


How sad the BSA is replacing what parents should be doing.

If it is the goal or Scouting to provide men of good character that can take care of themselves and care for others, and the parents aren't doing their job, it makes it a greater task for Scouting to address these issues.

Programs that don't assume this responsibility aren't following BSA goals.

If BP said take the houligan and turn him into a good citizen, then that's what we are to do. Yes, the world around has changed, but the goal hasn't.

Stosh
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#22 Kudu

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 09:04 AM

Maybe a tie into the new marketing slogan "Prepared. For Life," which was introduced as "Life" being the opposite of the Scoutcraft defined by our Congressional Charter.

The Chief Scout Executive's "What do we mean by 'Prepared. For Life'?" speech never mentions Scoutcraft, except to say that the 1916 requirements are "not important."

The video is still online:

http://inquiry.net/l...with_adults.htm
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#23 skeptic

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 03:11 PM

Definitely feel Personal Management is one that absolutely needs to stay, especially in this era.

 

Now the other skills might also include tieing a necktie with a basic overhand and maybe even double Windsor.

 

They could call the badge Living Single Skills, or maybe the old Home Economics.  


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#24 qwazse

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 04:12 PM

How about somebody posting proof (besides some plackard found in a disorganized scout shop) that this is still currently being considered by the merit badge task force, please?


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#25 perdidochas

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 08:37 AM

My Scout son was just taking the BSA survey regarding potential new merit badges. One that caught my eye was "Life Skills". It would include sewing, cooking, & I didn't see the rest of it. It struck me as kinda different as the parts of the merit badge (potential) are already covered in other merit badges. Seemed like really a "fluff" mb. What's your opinion?

I'm with Tampa Turtle--I'd be ok if it was a replacement for Family Life, for example. 


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#26 perdidochas

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 08:47 AM

I got a question for the group. So explain to me again. Aren't most of the things your discussing here things that their Parents are supposed to be teaching them at home?????? Yet year after year we see boys who have never made a piece of toast or PB&J entering the troop. Pretty sure my son can change the brakes on my truck, change a flat tire, sew his patches on his uniform, shower and make himself dinner after he is done. How sad the BSA is replacing what parents should be doing.

My sons can do all of the above except change the brakes on a truck (they are third generation non-mechanics).  They can jumpstart a car, though. 

 

I've found that through my time in Scouts as a parent, that a lot of the "requirements" from Tiger Cub on are things that we had already been doing with our sons.  The way I see it, if the parents are teaching it at home, it's a piece of cake for the boys to do it in Scouts.


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#27 Back Pack

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 07:39 AM

I had a new Scout volunteer to be cook. His PL walked him though the menu planning (done as a patrol), helped him work out his shopping list and even picking certain brands (food allergy issue). The kid was set. He knew what to do. The Sat dinner was "Sliders". Simple enough.

Come Friday night the young man got sick and could not go camping. Mom dropped off the food in the cooler.

Saturday afternoon the PL comes to me and says "We've got a problem." I go with him and the SPL to investigate.

The Scout (or the mother) purchases individually wrapped MICROWAVEABLE Sliders, clearly marked for microwaves in big red letters across the box!!!

Our PLs stopped assuming ANYONE could cook after that. We now start ALL of our scouts at Step #1 as part of teaching cooking at camp.

Edited by Back Pack, 20 April 2017 - 07:40 AM.

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