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Life Skills merit badge


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#1 KenDavis500

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 02:49 PM

My Scout son was just taking the BSA survey regarding potential new merit badges. One that caught my eye was "Life Skills". It would include sewing, cooking, & I didn't see the rest of it. It struck me as kinda different as the parts of the merit badge (potential) are already covered in other merit badges. Seemed like really a "fluff" mb. What's your opinion?
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#2 King Ding Dong

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 06:00 PM

Yes cooking and dishes are covered elsewhere. Sewing is not. laundry and ironing is not. Basic automobile skills, MB in intense. Very basic home skills like running toilet, stopped toilet, finding circuit breaker.
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#3 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 09:54 AM

I like the idea of it IF it was an alternate to another of those new un-scouty relevant Eagle required MB like Personal Management or Family Life.
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#4 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:58 AM

Yes cooking and dishes are covered elsewhere. Sewing is not. laundry and ironing is not. Basic automobile skills, MB in intense. Very basic home skills like running toilet, stopped toilet, finding circuit breaker.

I like the basic mechanical skills. Maybe one on asking a girl out?
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#5 Kudu

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 11:12 AM

Maybe a tie into the new marketing slogan "Prepared. For Life," which was introduced as "Life" being the opposite of the Scoutcraft defined by our Congressional Charter.
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#6 Twocubdad

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:41 PM

I like to think the whole program is one big life skills badge. And yeah, ever couple years we have a mom come in a teach how to sew on a patch and hem pants.
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#7 King Ding Dong

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:05 PM

Yes cooking and dishes are covered elsewhere. Sewing is not. laundry and ironing is not. Basic automobile skills, MB in intense. Very basic home skills like running toilet, stopped toilet, finding circuit breaker.

1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while asking a girl out including dry mouth, stuttering, cold sweats, heart attack, stroke, stopped breathing and incontenance.

2. Do the following:
(a) Identify the conditions that must exist before asking a girl out. Explain how such conditions are recognized.
(b) Demonstrate the proper technique for kissing using a training device approved by your counselor.

3. Do two of the following
A). Ask a girl out using semaphore
B). Ask a girl out using the line "I know how to light your fire..."
C). Using your stave club her over the head and drag her back to your tarp tent.
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#8 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:40 AM

Maybe a tie into the new marketing slogan "Prepared. For Life," which was introduced as "Life" being the opposite of the Scoutcraft defined by our Congressional Charter.

I refuse to acknowledge that slogan. Hate it,
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#9 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:45 AM

Yes cooking and dishes are covered elsewhere. Sewing is not. laundry and ironing is not. Basic automobile skills, MB in intense. Very basic home skills like running toilet, stopped toilet, finding circuit breaker.

If it is Eagle required:

4. Do the following:
A) Take a girl out for a meal you cook yourself. Demonstrate good table manners.
B) Meet her parents.
C) Take her out dancing. Be seen physically dancing with her.

For years a mom and I had a running joke with a new scout that the "Dancing MB" was Eagle required. We told him it had ballerina slippers on it and the mom was the MBC. The final requirement was an interpretive dance--jazz, tap, or freestyle--at the Court of Honor.

After a few weeks of our cruelty the boy came up to us, sighed, and said "Well...if it is Eagle required I will do it."
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#10 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 02:24 PM

I was getting so frustrated about the boys never putting their POR patches on. Then it occurred to me--your term doesn't start until we see you with your patch sewn on!
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#11 Bando

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 02:34 PM

I was getting so frustrated about the boys never putting their POR patches on. Then it occurred to me--your term doesn't start until we see you with your patch sewn on!

* "No council, committee, district, unit, or individual has the authority to add to, or subtract from, advancement requirements."

:)
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#12 JoeBob

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 02:40 PM

I was getting so frustrated about the boys never putting their POR patches on. Then it occurred to me--your term doesn't start until we see you with your patch sewn on!

"serve actively 6 months in one or more of the positions of responsibility..."

I think the troop gets to determine when that service begins and what constitutes serving.
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#13 perdidochas

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 03:01 PM

Maybe a tie into the new marketing slogan "Prepared. For Life," which was introduced as "Life" being the opposite of the Scoutcraft defined by our Congressional Charter.

I like the slogan "Prepared. For Life." I believe that the scoutcraft we do teach is preparing scouts for life. I know that the scoutcraft I learned as a Scout back in the late 1970s helped to prepare me for life.

I don't think this is a bad badge, but I would like it if it replaced Family Life and Personal Management. That way the number of Eagle required remains the same (after the addition of cooking), and we get rid of a non-outdoors MB. I'd also like to see the Citizenship MBs reduced to one, and add two either/or badges--either Canoeing, Backpacking, or Kayaking and either Pioneering or Orienteering. My sons are currently Star and Life, and have gotten all of the "fun" Eagle required badges. The Star Scout has a bunch (all the Citizenships, Communication, Fam life, and personal management, for example). The Life has three (communication, Fam Life and Personal management).
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#14 Stosh

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 03:08 PM

I'm thinking every boy should be able to sew a button on, patch torn uniform pants, hem them up, sew on a patch and sew a torn tent/pack. Besides sewing, basic kitchen skills, laundry skills, plumbing and electrical are all useful skills. But so are scout craft skills. Anyone that can cook on an open fire or camp stove, can cook at a kitchen stove. Menus in camp can be the same at home. Of course it's a lot easier to do it at home, and that seems to be the elephant in the room. Making a bed in the woods is not the same as making a bed at home. Yep, Parlour Scout is a fitting definition. Of course there's not much adventure in kitchen cooking no matter how much Julia Childs says differently. Stosh
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#15 MattR

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 03:47 PM

jblake, I was in college, we wanted to celebrate, so someone said, "let's make some sort of flambe thing." All we had was 151Rum. Plenty of adventure in a kitchen.
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#16 Basementdweller

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 07:33 AM

I got a question for the group. So explain to me again. Aren't most of the things your discussing here things that their Parents are supposed to be teaching them at home?????? Yet year after year we see boys who have never made a piece of toast or PB&J entering the troop. Pretty sure my son can change the brakes on my truck, change a flat tire, sew his patches on his uniform, shower and make himself dinner after he is done. How sad the BSA is replacing what parents should be doing.
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#17 Stosh

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 07:49 AM

I got a question for the group.


So explain to me again. Aren't most of the things your discussing here things that their Parents are supposed to be teaching them at home??????

Yet year after year we see boys who have never made a piece of toast or PB&J entering the troop. Pretty sure my son can change the brakes on my truck, change a flat tire, sew his patches on his uniform, shower and make himself dinner after he is done.


How sad the BSA is replacing what parents should be doing.

????

Day care gets them up to pre-school.
Then pre-school gets them up to school
Then the schools work their magic.
And voila, you have a well-adjusted 18 year old that's ready to go out in the world.
Now all you have to do is work the next 18 years getting him out of the house. You can send them off to college, but like any stray, they're going to be back soon sitting on your stoop.

What's there really for the parents to do until they're 18+?

Stosh
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#18 perdidochas

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 07:54 AM

I got a question for the group.


So explain to me again. Aren't most of the things your discussing here things that their Parents are supposed to be teaching them at home??????

Yet year after year we see boys who have never made a piece of toast or PB&J entering the troop. Pretty sure my son can change the brakes on my truck, change a flat tire, sew his patches on his uniform, shower and make himself dinner after he is done.


How sad the BSA is replacing what parents should be doing.

That is the way of the world these days. Parents aren't teaching kids as much, in general. My boys, when they entered Boy Scouts, could cook eggs or toast. They can do laundry and wash pots/pans/dishes, in a kitchen sink, camp sink or dishwasher (even commercial dishwasher now, due to helping out on a service project involving the church kitchen). That said, if you look at personal management or Family life merit badges, parents should be teaching that as well. Same with cooking merit badge, etc.
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#19 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 08:03 AM

I was getting so frustrated about the boys never putting their POR patches on. Then it occurred to me--your term doesn't start until we see you with your patch sewn on!

Serving, by our local definition--and agreed to before taking the POR, includes 70% of attending meeting (excused absence beforehand can be permitted--most don't bother), some specific duties, and 70% campouts, The way I see it if you didn't do anything in a given month we could say he was active for 5 of the 6 months. Or we could extend the POR by a month and see if he improves which is what we are doing and I think may be a BAD idea. BTW there is no "surprise" ambush going on.
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#20 Tampa Turtle

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 08:19 AM

When I hit 13 my mom started "Batchelor proofing" her 3 boys. Her requirements: (1) Be able to cook 3 basic dishes so we wouldn't starve. (I believe grilled cheese counted) (2) Do your own laundry. ( skill that had me helping many pretty girls who were clueless in the freshman dorm laundry. :) (3) Be able to do some basic sewing. Use a sewing machine. Make a pair of pants. (4) Learn how to shop for your own clothes and judge quality of garment. We bought our own school clothes. (5) Be able to order from a restaurant with good table manners. (6) Basic slow dancing with a girl (the mom waltz) with the hands in the right place. She said being the mother of 3 boys she did not want us making our girlfriends do all that. My sister did not have to do any of this! My Dad insisted: (6) Rotating your tires. (7) Changing oil. (8) Bleeding brakes. (9) How to build a basic stud wall. (10) Update an account in a ledger, calculate interest, and set up our own bank account. (our allowances were in THE ledger) (11) Wire a switch and an outlet. (12) Snake a drain clog, swap out a toilet innards, and change faucets washers. (13) Be able to identify 10 basic hand tools. Do not leave Dad's saw in the rain (fail) (14) Look up entries in reference materials. (My Dad would leave volumes of "How Things Work, the Oxford Dictionary, and Von Nostrand's Scientific Dictionary on the toliet tank in the boys bathroom. Quizs were at the dinner table) No MB was given upon completion.
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