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What was the best thing you learned from Wood Badge?


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#21 scouter659

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Posted 19 October 2002 - 03:03 PM

I learned a great deal from my Wood Badge course NE III - 151. I learned that if the program is executed correctly you can't help not to produce better human beings. There were so many fine moments on my course. If you've considered Wood Badge but aren't sure, there's something to be said about being in the middle of 50 or 60 Scouters who 'believe' in the organization aims and principles. It will rub off on you. I recently finished my ticket and am planning a bead ceremony in December. I have also been informed that I am under consideration to serve on the Staff of the next course. After having experienced Wood Badge for the 21st. Century, it would be a high honor to be a part of a group of people responsible to present this wonderful material. I used to be a Bob WhiteI always will.
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#22 red feather

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Posted 19 October 2002 - 11:47 PM

KoreaScouter, ditto. A chance to be young again with the learning and knowledge of age. It taught me how others percieve who I think I am. Enthusiasm can be infectious and not all that hard to do. Would like to go through it again as a scout and relearn, refresh what I experienced the first time. Hope to have time to be on staff.(someday) YIS, a good ol'beaver. (if it's not for the boys it's not worth a dam)
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#23 wffarrell

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Posted 13 November 2002 - 12:19 AM

Hello All, For me it was learning to identify and use resources. You know, you don't have to do it all yourself. That was a hard, but valuable, lesson for me. I'm much better, not perfect, but much better at identifying my resources and using them; both in Scouting and at work. It's a powerful tool. Regards, bill
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#24 tictac

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Posted 08 December 2002 - 07:37 PM

I am first year colony scouter in Ontario Canada. Just completed my woodbage advanced. With the information I learned during my course; I both a better scouter and non-scouter.
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#25 mk9750

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Posted 12 December 2002 - 04:13 PM

I am absolutely CERTAIN I know what I am bringing on myself by posting this, but.. IS woodbadge really this good? I've never had the desire to even investigate it bcause every time I've heard our locals talking about it, it seems less like training that will help deliver a better program for the boys, and more like Scouting for adults. Not that I have any problem with pretending to be a boy scout, but given the choice of spending time pursuing my own fun, and working directly with the boys, I'll take the latter any day. But, I have to say, with so many of you heatily endorsing WB, maybe I should get more info and check it out. this is my first visit to this section of the forums. Maybe I'll learn more as I read on. If you have anything that will make me see that my perception is out of whack, please post. Mark
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#26 tictac

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Posted 12 December 2002 - 08:59 PM

I would recommend WB2 training for anyone. In Canada we have 3 sections beaver(5-7), cubs(8-10)scouts (11-14)-16) Although my course which was 3 weekends long focused on Beaver Progam: I learned about the different programs. The knowledge and friendships will last a life time! All course participants received an address and e-mail list of the people in the course!! This will be an excellent resource for both them and me. I would suggest that you take the WB2 course in a different area. This way you get the knowledge of different scouters. Usually scouters from certian area solve problems the same way!!
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#27 KoreaScouter

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Posted 13 December 2002 - 02:33 AM

MK: Good questions. WB is like many other things that require personal effort...you get out of it what you put into it. And, what you put in is mostly intangible, and therefore, what get out is also mostly intangible. My WB course was a little different from most, in that we did the whole thing straight through in a long week, rather than break it up over two weekends (had to -- it was in Okinawa and most of us had to fly there). That made some of us homebody moms and dads missing the families and wanting to get out of there, but it certainly didn't detract from the experience. Very little program administration stuff; you should have gotten that in SM fundamentals. Ditto for outdoor skills; you're expected to know that when you show up. It's not a camping school; that's what National Camping School is for. It's all about human dynamics, and they're very clever about how you get the message. You probably won't find anyone who will knowingly lay it all out on the table for you ahead of time. It would be like someone telling you the ending of the movie you just paid 8 bucks to see. By all means, if you have a chance to go, do it. You'll have a good time up front, but your units will benefit for the rest of the time you're a Scouter...a fair return on investment. KS
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