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Eagle Scout Rank Patch wear after age 18


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#201 EmberMike

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 01:57 PM

I'm not advocating MORE bling for adults, per se. Just a better way for Eagles to be recognized.

 

 

That's kind of why I like your idea or the alternate council shoulder patch. It's recognition within existing insignia, rather than adding more. 

 

Personally I think the square knot says enough. This is a youth program, adult recognition should be subtle. 


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#202 TAHAWK

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 02:05 PM

It's funny, i thought the same thing. How could an Eagle knot NOT be obvious, right? But to most in Scouting they honestly don't know what the knots are for, let alone which signifies "I am an Eagle". 

 

The medal cannot be worn with the uniform, so it must be with a blazer. Wearing the Eagle necker all the time I think is like wearing your dress blues in the Marines; sure you look great but it is hardly practical. The shoulder patch would be great but not every council has one.

 

I was a soccer referee for a long time. When I retired I became an emeritus referee. Same patch, just with olive branches around it or something like that. Maybe BSA could do something like that for Eagles who are over 18.

 

I'm not advocating MORE bling for adults, per se. Just a better way for Eagles to be recognized.

 

Personally, I'd like to see knots limited to no more than 6, but that would make most district and council volunteers red with rage.

 

So I won a youth award over sixty years ago?  What should that mean to a Scout whose grandparents may not have been alive then?  He has no idea what was required for Eagle then - what my journey was.  Pin the Lifesaving MB on the ribbon?  I hope he judges me by my behavior - period.

 

You can wear the medal on the Official Uniform at "formal occasions."  I have done that once as an adult due to a specific request for a BPI that all Eagles wear their medals.  (Exploring Silver Award recipients were not asked to wear that medal.)


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#203 Col. Flagg

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 03:04 PM

That's kind of why I like your idea or the alternate council shoulder patch. It's recognition within existing insignia, rather than adding more. 

 

Personally I think the square knot says enough. This is a youth program, adult recognition should be subtle. 

 

I agree the knot should suffice. Too often very few people know what it means.

 

Also, I think wearing 10,000 knots on one's chest defeats the simple purpose of the knot. We have a guy who is a looooong time Scouter. Has upwards of 10 knots; wears three. Eagle Scout, AOL and his religious knot. That's it.

 

So I won a youth award over sixty years ago?  What should that mean to a Scout whose grandparents may not have been alive then?  He has no idea what was required for Eagle then - what my journey was.  Pin the Lifesaving MB on the ribbon?  I hope he judges me by my behavior - period.

 

You can wear the medal on the Official Uniform at "formal occasions."  I have done that once as an adult due to a specific request for a BPI that all Eagles wear their medals.  (Exploring Silver Award recipients were not asked to wear that medal.)

 

Don't disagree. I'd rather things be simple and clear, not just to us but to those who may have no idea what a patch may mean.

 

All I am saying is that if we want to simplify and call attention to Eagles, having something obvious and simple would work. It would require some thought from BSA and some restraint from Scouters who are knot-happy.


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#204 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 04:24 PM

Regarding knots, my philosophy is I don't care what you wear.

 

I do know from first hand experience, new Cub parents feel comfortable with someone "experience" in a leadership role, even if the experience is based upon working with Boy Scouts.

 

Me personally, I wear none to some to all, depending upon the shirt.


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#205 TAHAWK

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 04:32 PM

"I do know from first hand experience, new Cub parents feel comfortable with someone "experience" in a leadership role, even if the experience is based upon working with Boy Scouts."

 

Larger Service Stars?


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#206 EmberMike

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 09:26 AM

I do know from first hand experience, new Cub parents feel comfortable with someone "experience" in a leadership role, even if the experience is based upon working with Boy Scouts.

 

I think the "Trained" patch goes a long way in that regard. Even though in reality it doesn't take a heck of a lot of time or experience to get a Trained patch. But to parents who don't know anything about it, it's pretty self-explanatory. 

 

And that's kind of the problem with square knots, right? They're very abstract. Even people with years in the program couldn't identify many of them. Not sure I could name them all, especially the more uncommon ones. 

 

I hesitate to suggest that patches should be more wordy and explanatory like the Trained patch. We could easily start too look like we're wearing a nascar jumpsuit instead of a BSA uniform if every patch had text on it. But there is definitely some benefit to patches that make experience and training a bit easier to decipher. 


Edited by EmberMike, 16 February 2017 - 09:26 AM.

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#207 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 10:04 AM

The knots is what I mean.

 

They may not know what service stars mean. And having a trained patch for some may not mean much since they were recruited as a leader with their Cub and know they have to do online training only. But having the knots, even if they do not know what they mean are somewhat reassuring in my experience. And I also found the knots to be a convesation starter.


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#208 Col. Flagg

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 11:28 AM

I think the "Trained" patch goes a long way in that regard. Even though in reality it doesn't take a heck of a lot of time or experience to get a Trained patch. But to parents who don't know anything about it, it's pretty self-explanatory.

 

They may not know what service stars mean. And having a trained patch for some may not mean much since they were recruited as a leader with their Cub and know they have to do online training only.


When I was looking for Scout troops many years back, experience and training was one of my questions of each troop.

 

Fast forward many years later when I became an SM, and one of the things we provide to the visiting parents is a detailed summary of each's leaders' training and years of service. This has helped us a great deal in recruiting because we require all SMs to have the usual (YPT, IOLS, Lader-specific) training, but also require all the other online courses (x Safely, weather, etc.), and CPR/AED. We make sure we have at least 4-6 valid WRFA and ARC first aid trained folks too, which we often exceed. Since we do shooting sports we have 4-5 NRA and USA Archery trained folks as well. To top it off, we have the JASMs and many of the older Scouts take much of this training too Let's face it, it's easy and it helps show commitment to safety.


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#209 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 12:58 PM

I agree the more training the better, especially for Troops, Ships, and Crews.  But brand new Cub parents may not know what's up, or may find out the little training needed to be a Cub leader. The knots tell them someone has a clue as to what is going on :)


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#210 EmberMike

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 01:54 PM

 

When I was looking for Scout troops many years back, experience and training was one of my questions of each troop.

 

Fast forward many years later when I became an SM, and one of the things we provide to the visiting parents is a detailed summary of each's leaders' training and years of service. This has helped us a great deal in recruiting because we require all SMs to have the usual (YPT, IOLS, Lader-specific) training, but also require all the other online courses (x Safely, weather, etc.), and CPR/AED. We make sure we have at least 4-6 valid WRFA and ARC first aid trained folks too, which we often exceed. Since we do shooting sports we have 4-5 NRA and USA Archery trained folks as well. To top it off, we have the JASMs and many of the older Scouts take much of this training too Let's face it, it's easy and it helps show commitment to safety.

 

 

 

I really like this approach, giving parents detailed info about leadership. Might have to borrow this idea from you. :)


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#211 Col. Flagg

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 03:04 PM

I really like this approach, giving parents detailed info about leadership. Might have to borrow this idea from you. :)

 

You mean you want to appropriate it?  :D  Why not? We borrowed it from someone else too.

 

On our website we have "trained" patches next to the SMs, OA next to OA, etc. We even put the training resumes on the site so folks can see. This is included in the pdf file we distribute during the open house. It really helps cut down on the common questions during open house and allows the parents to see their kids having fun instead.


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#212 Stosh

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 03:12 PM

I agree the more training the better, especially for Troops, Ships, and Crews.  But brand new Cub parents may not know what's up, or may find out the little training needed to be a Cub leader. The knots tell them someone has a clue as to what is going on :)

 

Not necessarily.  :)


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Stosh

 

There's a reason why I don't always answer the phone, doorbell or comments on forums.  :)


#213 Eagle94-A1

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 07:25 PM

Not necessarily.  :)

 

Oh I agree. I know I made mistakes. Biggest one was when I was a brand new DL, I sometimes treated them as Boy Scouts and expected them to act like Boy Scouts. Then get upset when they didn't meet the expectation. MISTAKE!


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