Jump to content



Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Eagle Scout Rank Patch wear after age 18


  • Please log in to reply
257 replies to this topic

#181 Stosh

Stosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12466 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 12:05 AM

I don't do the bell thingy, but I do sing while in bear country.   Bears have pretty good sense of hearing so it doesn't need to be at any heavy metal or operatic volumes.  Just enough to let the bear know you're coming and not startle them.  :)

 

A couple of years back I was at Yellowstone and going from one area to the next along a lesser used path.  I was with the Mrs. and was singing a little marching ditty as I walked along.  Coming down the trail towards us was another couple who smiled and said, "I see you're having a pleasant day"  I smiled and answered, "And if I sing enough to warn the bears that I'm coming, it'll stay that way."  They chuckled and went on their way.... both began to sing, too.  :)  

 

I understand the safety issue as well as the LNT issue.  I don't wear bright colors but do carry them for emergency purposes only.  I don't play loud music, but I do sing at certain times.  There can be a reasonable balance between Safety and LNT.


  • 0

#182 Rick_in_CA

Rick_in_CA

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 709 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 05:52 AM

I have adhered to the LNT which goes beyond just cleaning up after yourself and not making a permanent impact on things.  Loud colors, loud noises, unsavory smells, etc. all go along with the LNT principle.  No one wants to go out into the wilderness to enjoy the simplicity of nature and have Ringling Brother Barnam and Bailey show up next door.  If one is worried about the right yellow tent being able to be seen in an emergency, a yellow survival blanket or poncho works just as well.  As a matter of fact, smoke and fire do a pretty good job too.  There are other alternatives besides a perpetual circus atmosphere when there  isn't an emergency.

True, but what if you aren’t aware of the emergency?

This reminds me of a story I was told when I was a Webelos. A troop had been back packing, and were camped in a steep valley. They had no idea but a forest fire was heading their way about to cut off their only exit. It was their day-glow orange tents that saved them. They were woken up by a forest service helicopter and told to evacuate. They basically left most of their gear and ran. It was a near run thing.

They were later told that the forest service had no idea a boy scout troop was there. The helicopter was flying past and had it’s spot light on. It was the flash of orange as they flew by that caught their eye and caused them to turn back and check it out. If the troop had not been using high visibility tents, the whole thing might have ended very differently.

The story was very dramatic (especially to a 10 year old - lots of fire and smoke, the ASM telling the story was a good storyteller), and has stuck with me ever since. And one of the reasons why I want a high visibility tent if I go into the back country. I want to be easy to find, even if I think everything is fine.


  • 0

#183 Rick_in_CA

Rick_in_CA

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 709 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 05:53 AM

I have adhered to the LNT which goes beyond just cleaning up after yourself and not making a permanent impact on things.  Loud colors, loud noises, unsavory smells, etc. all go along with the LNT principle.  No one wants to go out into the wilderness to enjoy the simplicity of nature and have Ringling Brother Barnam and Bailey show up next door.  If one is worried about the right yellow tent being able to be seen in an emergency, a yellow survival blanket or poncho works just as well.  As a matter of fact, smoke and fire do a pretty good job too.  There are other alternatives besides a perpetual circus atmosphere when there  isn't an emergency.

True, but what if you aren’t aware of the emergency?

This reminds me of a story I was told when I was a Webelos. A troop had been back packing, and were camped in a steep valley. They had no idea but a forest fire was heading their way about to cut off their only exit. It was their day-glow orange tents that saved them. They were woken up by a forest service helicopter and told to evacuate. They basically left most of their gear and ran. It was a near run thing.

They were later told that the forest service had no idea a boy scout troop was there. The helicopter was flying past and had it’s spot light on. It was the flash of orange as they flew by that caught their eye and caused them to turn back and check it out. If the troop had not been using high visibility tents, the whole thing might have ended very differently.

The story was very dramatic (especially to a 10 year old - lots of fire and smoke, the ASM telling the story was a good storyteller), and has stuck with me ever since. And one of the reasons why I want a high visibility tent if I go into the back country. I want to be easy to find, even if I think everything is fine.


  • 0

#184 Stosh

Stosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12466 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 07:13 AM

One can play the "What-If" game all day long and it doesn't make sense in the long run.  More people are killed by lightning than forest fires annually.  Therefor all scouts in the woods need to wear blaze orange lightning rod beanies and keep one foot on the ground at all times.   This is a year around problem.  Even in blizzards, the National Weather Service has recorded lightning strikes in the area.  I don't think the BSA scout shops carry these beanies, but for the safety of the boys, maybe they should.

 

 

Just sayin'

 

:)


  • 0

#185 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2929 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 07:16 AM

Aluminum foil beanies with grounding cable?


  • 0

#186 Stosh

Stosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12466 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 07:24 AM

As long as they are metal and blaze orange they will work.

 

Along these same lines, some people have said that when they tune the lightning rod like an antenna, they can pick up local weather radio and get a jump on the process.


  • 0

#187 Sentinel947

Sentinel947

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 1628 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 07:47 AM

Personally, I'm not a hunter or soldier out in the brush who needs to blend in, the color of my gear is not a consideration in my gear buying process. 


  • 0

#188 Stosh

Stosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12466 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 09:48 AM

Personally, I'm not a hunter or soldier out in the brush who needs to blend in, the color of my gear is not a consideration in my gear buying process. 

 

 

LOL!  I am a hunter and by law I have to wear blaze orange during deer season.  That's the only outdoor clothing I have that doesn't fit my back to nature comfort zone.


  • 0

#189 EmberMike

EmberMike

    Member

  • Members
  • 302 posts

Posted 14 February 2017 - 09:53 AM

I've never cared much if a kid turns 18 and keeps the badge on. At least for a little while. Eventually it might be worth suggesting the square knot. 

 

There's an adult leader in my area who is probably in his 50s and wears the eagle badge and the square knot. I've only seen him a few times but next time I might be compelled to ask about it. :)


  • 0

#190 desertrat77

desertrat77

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2260 posts

Posted 14 February 2017 - 07:46 PM

Adults wearing the oval Eagle patch was not common in the '70s, but it was not uncommon either.  


Edited by desertrat77, 14 February 2017 - 08:03 PM.

  • 0

#191 TAHAWK

TAHAWK

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2929 posts

Posted 14 February 2017 - 08:50 PM

Truly, the DEAD have arisen.


  • 0

#192 Back Pack

Back Pack

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 691 posts

Posted 14 February 2017 - 10:00 PM

Why have a uniform code then?
  • 0

#193 Stosh

Stosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12466 posts

Posted 14 February 2017 - 10:02 PM

Why have a uniform code then?

They don't the uniform isn't even required, but try going to Jamboree without one then you'll hear about it.


  • 0

#194 Back Pack

Back Pack

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 691 posts

Posted 15 February 2017 - 07:46 AM

They don't the uniform isn't even required, but try going to Jamboree without one then you'll hear about it.


Well maybe not a code but there's an insignia guide for a reason which states who and how the patch can be worn. I suspect the intention there is that people, if wearing the uniform, wear it correctly. Otherwise they wouldn't have one.
I suspect it's much like leash laws. Most adhere to it because it's the law. Others do what they want and don't care.
  • 0

#195 EmberMike

EmberMike

    Member

  • Members
  • 302 posts

Posted 15 February 2017 - 09:47 AM

For me there's an element of respect involved in this particular case. We're not talking about someone who wants to still wear an outdated patch or something non-standard elsewhere on the uniform. This is about the highest rank and a badge that's intended specifically for youth wear. And also one that has an adult alternative in the form of a square knot. Some districts even have an eagle-specific council shoulder patch adults can wear. 

 

So when there are well-established adult options to show that you're an eagle and you insist on still wearing the badge, especially well past your youth years, to me it's a bit disrespectful. I'm certainly not a stickler when it comes to uniform code. Surely I've probably had some violations of my own over the years. But when it comes to eagle stuff, I just feel like that's an area that deserves a bit more of a concerted effort to stick with the code. 


  • 0

#196 Stosh

Stosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12466 posts

Posted 15 February 2017 - 10:30 AM

I'm all in favor with that.  Either have a FULL uniform and wear it correctly or go without completely.  This general rule of half-way compliance is unacceptable.


  • 0

#197 Col. Flagg

Col. Flagg

    Robert E. Lee - Patriot

  • Members
  • 1415 posts

Posted 15 February 2017 - 10:50 AM

For me there's an element of respect involved in this particular case. We're not talking about someone who wants to still wear an outdated patch or something non-standard elsewhere on the uniform. This is about the highest rank and a badge that's intended specifically for youth wear. And also one that has an adult alternative in the form of a square knot. Some districts even have an eagle-specific council shoulder patch adults can wear. 

 

So when there are well-established adult options to show that you're an eagle and you insist on still wearing the badge, especially well past your youth years, to me it's a bit disrespectful. I'm certainly not a stickler when it comes to uniform code. Surely I've probably had some violations of my own over the years. But when it comes to eagle stuff, I just feel like that's an area that deserves a bit more of a concerted effort to stick with the code

 

I chuckle every time I hear the phrase "stick to the code"...for obvious reasons.

 

I agree with you. The Eagle knot, special council strip, Eagle necker are all ways an adult Scouter can show he's an Eagle. There's also the NESA lifetime member knot.

 

I'd be in favor of a change if the BSA made it to allow adults to wear something that more obviously signifies they are an Eagle Scout.


Edited by Col. Flagg, 15 February 2017 - 10:51 AM.

  • 0

#198 qwazse

qwazse

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 6841 posts

Posted 15 February 2017 - 11:50 AM

... I'd be in favor of a change if the BSA made it to allow adults to wear something that more obviously signifies they are an Eagle Scout.

 

More obvious than a medal, a knot, a necker, a slide, and a (gasp) shoulder patch?

How about piercing ... a silver tattoo ... maybe a drone-suspended halo?

 

If they could earn them while serving as adult leaders, I wouldn't mind them wearing them. But, I'd rather be on the same "clean slate" as my SM.


  • 2

#199 Col. Flagg

Col. Flagg

    Robert E. Lee - Patriot

  • Members
  • 1415 posts

Posted 15 February 2017 - 12:53 PM

More obvious than a medal, a knot, a necker, a slide, and a (gasp) shoulder patch?

How about piercing ... a silver tattoo ... maybe a drone-suspended halo?

 

If they could earn them while serving as adult leaders, I wouldn't mind them wearing them. But, I'd rather be on the same "clean slate" as my SM.

 

It's funny, i thought the same thing. How could an Eagle knot NOT be obvious, right? But to most in Scouting they honestly don't know what the knots are for, let alone which signifies "I am an Eagle". 

 

The medal cannot be worn with the uniform, so it must be with a blazer. Wearing the Eagle necker all the time I think is like wearing your dress blues in the Marines; sure you look great but it is hardly practical. The shoulder patch would be great but not every council has one.

 

I was a soccer referee for a long time. When I retired I became an emeritus referee. Same patch, just with olive branches around it or something like that. Maybe BSA could do something like that for Eagles who are over 18.

 

I'm not advocating MORE bling for adults, per se. Just a better way for Eagles to be recognized.

 

Personally, I'd like to see knots limited to no more than 6, but that would make most district and council volunteers red with rage.


  • 0

#200 Stosh

Stosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 12466 posts

Posted 15 February 2017 - 01:51 PM

I'm all in favor of a shako with gold braid and a 4" silver shield on it that says "I am an Eagle". 


  • 0




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users